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Satellite tracking provides clues about South Atlantic sea turtles' 'lost years'

(University of Central Florida) A University of Central Florida biologist whose groundbreaking work tracking the movements of sea turtle yearlings in the North Atlantic Ocean attracted international attention has completed a similar study in the South Atlantic with surprising results.
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