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How we watch TV without cable (and how much it costs)

One of the main reasons Kim and I decided to move from our condo to this quiet country cottage was to save money. We were spending far too much living in the city. Simply moving made a huge difference to our budget. But now that the dust has settled, it’s time for us to look […] The post How we watch TV without cable (and how much it costs) appeared first on Get Rich Slowly.
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