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Old rules apply in explaining extremely large magnetoresistance

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory compared similar materials and returned to a long-established rule of electron movement in their quest to explain the phenomenon of extremely large magnetoresistance (XMR), in which the application of a magnetic field to a material results in a remarkably large change in electrical resistance. It is a useful property, which could be used in the development of computers with increased processor speeds and data storage.
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