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The Gloriously Incompetent Politicians of Children’s Television

Screen Time is Slate’s pop-up blog about children’s TV, everywhere kids see it. The monocled little man who falls apart when his assistant goes on vacation, hiding in his underwear in his ruined mayoral office, clutching his jar of pickles. The self-centered, cigar-smoking womanizer flanked by models, who makes only the barest attempt to hide his corruption, holding his constituents in open contempt.
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