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Night owls have larger social networks than early birds

Using anonymous mobile phone data, Aalto University doctoral researcher Talayeh Aledavood has tapped into patterns in people's behaviour. She has found out that individual 'chronotypes,' the inherent periods of sleep during a 24-hour-period, correlate with the size of people's social networks, how much they are in contact with others, and also the kind of chronotypes with whom we interact.
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