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Marine organisms can shred a carrier bag into 1.75 million pieces, study shows

(University of Plymouth) A single plastic carrier bag could be shredded by marine organisms into 1.75 million microscopic fragments, according to new research published in Marine Pollution Bulletin and carried out by the University of Plymouth.
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Marine organisms can shred a plastic bag into 1.75 million pieces, study shows

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A single plastic carrier bag could be shredded by marine organisms into around 1.75million microscopic fragments, according to new research.

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