Post Profile






Could viruses take cancer immunotherapy to the next level?

(The Ottawa Hospital) Immunotherapy, which helps the body's immune system attack cancer, has revolutionized treatment for cancers such as melanoma and leukemia. However, many other kinds of cancer remain resistant. A new study suggests that a combination of two immunotherapies (oncolytic viruses and checkpoint inhibitors) could be much more successful. This combination could cure 60-90 percent of mice in aggressive breast cancer models.
read more

share

Related Posts


Why groundbreaking new cancer drugs still don’t work for most patients

Health : The Checkup

Immunotherapy, which aims to harness the body's immune system to fight off certain cancers, has received plenty of attention, praise and investment in recent years. Breakthrough treatments for melanoma and other cancers have shown s...

What is immunotherapy?

Health : The Guardian: Health

New immunotherapy drug IMM-101 brings fresh hope for the effective treatment of serious cancers What is immunotherapy? Immunotherapy is a drug treatment for cancer that stimulates the body’s immune system to recognise and attack tum...

Could viruses take cancer immunotherapy to the next level?

Academics / Biology : EurekAlert: Biology

(Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy) A study published in Science Translational Medicine shows a combination of oncolytic viruses and checkpoint inhibitors successfully treated breast cancer with a 60-90 percent cure rate.

Immune boosting virus could be used to treat brain tumors

Health : Reuters: Health

LONDON (Reuters) - A trial of a potential new brain cancer treatment has shown that a virus injected directly into the bloodstream can reach tumors deep inside the brain and switch on the body's own defense system to attack them.

Virus could treat brain tumours by boosting immune system

Diseases & Conditions / Cancer : EurekAlert: Cancer

(University of Leeds) Virus could act as an immunotherapy when injected into bloodstream. First human trial shows virus can cross blood-brain barrier to infect tumors and stimulate the body's immune system to attack the cancer.

Comments


Copyright © 2016 Regator, LLC