Post Profile






Spinal cord injury research: Bonus benefit to activity-based training

Researchers have discovered that the training, designed to help individuals with SCI improve motor function, also leads to improved bladder and bowel function and increased sexual desire.
read more

share

Related Posts


Bladder Function Restored in Animals with Severe Spinal Cord Injury

Health : Newswise Medical News

For the first time, researchers have restored significant bladder function through nerve regeneration in rats with the most severe spinal cord injuries (SCI). The breakthrough paired a traditional nerve bridge graft with a novel com...

Electrical Stimulation Could Improve Bladder Function in People with Spinal Cord Injuries

Health : Newswise Medical News

When individuals suffer a spinal cord injury, they often lose bladder control, which causes infections that can lead to kidney damage. Scientists used spinal stimulation technology to enable spinal cord- injured rats to empty their ...

Sensation, Mobility Improved For People With Spinal Cord Injury Using Musical Glove

Health : Medical News Today

Georgia Tech researchers have created a wireless, musical glove that may improve sensation and motor skills for people with paralyzing spinal cord injury (SCI). The gadget was successfully used by individuals with limited feeling or...

New treatment significantly improved bladder activity after spinal cord injury

Health : EurekAlert: Health

(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers have shown that compared to placebo, a drug treatment intended to prevent remodeling of the bladder wall and given within 48 hours after spinal cord injury (SCI) in dogs ...

Spinal cord injury research: Bonus benefit to activity-based training

Health : EurekAlert: Health

(University of Louisville) Researchers in the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC) at the University of Louisville have discovered that the training, designed to help individuals with SCI improve motor function, also...

Comments


Copyright © 2016 Regator, LLC