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A higher(er)-definition nose

(Drexel University) Sensors that sniff out chemicals in the air to warn us about everything from fires to carbon monoxide to drunk drivers to explosive devices hidden in luggage have improved so much that they can even detect diseases on a person's breath. Researchers from Drexel University and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a discovery that could make our best 'chemical noses' even more sensitive.
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