Post Profile






Two-stage gas sensor reports on soil dynamics

A gene "genie" developed by Rice University scientists grants researchers valuable data about microbes through puffs of gas from the soil. The latest version is a robust two-stage microbial sensor that will help bioengineers, geobiologists and other researchers observe gene expression and the bioavailability of nutrients in laboratory facsimiles of environments like soil and sediments without disturbing them.
read more

share

Related Posts


Research at Rice University leads to nanotube-based device for communication, security, sensing

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

Researchers at Rice University are using carbon nanotubes as the critical component of a robust terahertz polarizer that could accelerate the development of new security and communication devices, sensors and non-invasive medical im...

Scientists develop technique for measuring bacterial growth rates

Academics / Biology : Physorg: Biology

Ecological research focuses on understanding how population-level dynamics—such as the growth rate of a particular population of microbes—contribute to ecosystem-level processes. Ecosystem scientists researching climate change often...

Gas sensors 'see' through soil to analyze microbial interactions

Academics / General Science : ScienceDaily: Science Society

Researchers use programmed bacteria as gas sensors that help them 'see' into soil to learn about the behavior of the microbial communities within.

Gas sensors 'see' through soil to analyze microbial interactions

Academics / General Science : Science Codex

HOUSTON - (July 18, 2016) - Rice University researchers have developed gas biosensors to "see" into soil and allow them to follow the behavior of the microbial communities within. In a study in the American Chemical Society's journa...

Two-stage gas sensor reports on soil dynamics

Academics / Biology : EurekAlert: Biology

(Rice University) A robust two-stage microbial sensor developed at Rice University will help researchers observe gene expression and the bioavailability of nutrients in environments like soil and sediments without disturbing them.

Comments


Chemistry
Copyright © 2016 Regator, LLC