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How a hungry, hardy bacteria eats toxic metals and excretes gold nuggets

If the goose that laid the golden egg had a real-life counterpart, it would be C. metallidurans. This hardy little bacterium consumes toxic metals and excretes tiny gold nuggets, but how and why it does so has never been fully understood. Now, German and Australian researchers have peered inside the microorganism and figured out that mechanism... Continue Reading How a hungry, hardy bacter
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