Post Profile






Melting Glaciers Could Reveal How Our Ancestors Dealt With Changing Climates

While some archaeologists dig with trowels and shovels, others use a warming planet to their advantage. Archaeologist holding a c. 1400-year-old arrow, lost reindeer hunting in the high mountains of Oppland, Norway, during the Late Antique Little Ice Age. PHOTOGRAPH BYJULIAN MARTINSEN, SECRETS OF THE ICE OPPLAND COUNTY COUNCIL When Lars Pilø, co-director of the Glacier Archaeology Program at Oppland County Council, noticed Norway was experiencing a particularly warm autumn in 2006, the archaeologist turned to the mountains.
read more

share

Related Posts


Frozen in time: Glacial archaeology on the roof of Norway

Academics / Archaeology : EurekAlert: Archaeology

(University of Cambridge) Artefacts revealed by melting ice patches in the high mountains of Oppland shed new light on ancient high-altitude hunting.

Viking arrowheads emerge from melting Norwegian glaciers

Academics / Archaeology : Archaeology in Europe

High up in the mountains, archaeologists are now discovering human traces dating as far back as the Stone age. The oldest ice in this snowdrift glacier may have formed in the Stone Age. Now the ice is melting, and archaeologists hav...

Stone Age artefacts found in Norway's melting glaciers

Academics / Archaeology : Archaeology in Europe

Around 7,000 years ago the Earth was enjoying a warm climate. Now glaciers and patches of perennial ice in the high mountains of Southern Norway have started to melt again, revealing ancient layers. A small knife with a wooden handl...

Ice melting due to climate change reveals pre-Viking artifacts in Norway

Lifestyle / Green Living : Inhabitat

Climate change is melting ice in high mountains, enabling archaeologists to discover artifacts once preserved in glacial ice in Scandinavia, North America, and the Alps. A team led by Lars Pilø of the Oppland City Council recently p...

Melting Glaciers Could Reveal How Our Ancestors Dealt With Changing Climates

Academics / General Science : National Geographic News

While some archaeologists dig with trowels and shovels, others use a warming planet to their advantage.

Comments


Copyright © 2016 Regator, LLC