Discover a new way to find and share stories you'll love… Learn about Reading Desk

All Blogs / Politics / UK Politics / Popular


No partnership with Assad (and no scrutiny till summer’s up)

Philip Hammond this afternoon ruled out Britain working with President Assad in the fight against Isis, arguing that simply being aligned against a common enemy ‘doesn’t make us friends with… Continue reading The post No partnership with Assad (and no scrutiny till summer’s up) appeared first on Spectator Blogs.

The Populus “Mondays good for LAB, Fridays for CON” sequence finally comes to an end

It had to happen at some stage, I suppose, but today’s Populus online LAB lead of 6% brings to an end an extraordinary polling sequence – that those polls published on Mondays tended to show movement towards Labour while those coming out on Fridays moved back towards the Tories. Quite why this is hard to […]

Cringe at the Fringe: are these really the ten funniest jokes from Edinburgh?

According to a poll, the funniest one-liner at this year’s Edinburgh Fringe was a joke about a vacuum cleaner: ‘I’ve decided to sell my hoover… well, it was just collecting… Continue reading The post Cringe at the Fringe: are these really the ten funniest jokes from Edinburgh? appeared first on Spectator Blogs.

The growing campaign against John Bercow’s choice for Commons clerk

The campaign against Speaker Bercow’s plan to appoint Carol Mills as Clerk of the House is growing on the Tory backbenches. Coffee House has today been contacted by a series… Continue reading The post The growing campaign against John Bercow’s choice for Commons clerk appeared first on Spectator Blogs.

The dodgy world of posthumous art works

What does an artist do with work that isn’t quite up to his or her standards? Throw it out? Frank Stella and Robert Rauschenberg both tried that, putting artworks they… Continue reading The post The dodgy world of posthumous art works appeared first on Spectator Blogs.

William Hague has betrayed the Commons by backing John Bercow over Carol Mills

William Hague was a dud as foreign secretary. He has now in danger of turning into a useless Leader of the Commons. Within weeks of taking over from taking over from Andrew Lansley in the reshuffle, Mr Hague has been plunged into the biggest crisis to hit the Commons since the expenses scandal five years [...]

Why Britain is poorer than any US state, other than Mississippi

Now and again, American inequality is on display to the world. We saw it after Hurricane Katrina and we have seen it again in the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri. A… Continue reading The post Why Britain is poorer than any US state, other than Mississippi appeared first on Spectator Blogs.

The ‘Buckingham Bonaparte’ is cornered

With the interventions of former Speaker Betty Boothroyd, ex-ministers — including Jack Straw, Malcolm Rifkind and Margaret Beckett – and the Clerk of the Australian Senate, Rosemary Laing, it is becoming… Continue reading The post The ‘Buckingham Bonaparte’ is cornered appeared first on Spectator Blogs.

Independence Debate

Martin Kettle wrote an interesting piece on Scottish independence for The Guardian the other day in which he argues that things might get nasty after the referendum, in the sense that: a) The Barnett Formula will be used to cut per capita...Show More Summary

What's the Big Secret?

Compare and contrast the response of the Scottish Government to my recent FoI request to that of North Lanarkshire Council. In the Scottish Government's case they acknowledge receipt of my request while confirming that they will respond within the 20 working days laid down in the Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act 2002. Show More Summary

Medicine for the Dead

Here's an excellent article by James Bloodworth writing in The Independent which just goes to show that not everyone on the left of politics is an apologist for the increasingly ridiculous arguments of the Stop the War Coalition (STWC). Show More Summary

Questions and Answers

Robert Fisk breaks off from his usual anti-western rants in The Independent to write this rather more contemplative piece in which he asks the question that if ISIS are really as bad as people say, then why have so many Sunni Muslims stayed in their homes instead of taking to the hills. Show More Summary

Trial by TV

Here's an incredible video which has been released by an alleged 'eyewitness' to the shooting of Michael Brown by the Missouri police. Now a full scale campaign is underway to lay the blame at different doors before the facts have even been established and if you ask me, the release of Piaget Crenshaw's video is part of that campaign. Show More Summary

The Spectator at war: The scrap of paper that was worth a war

From The Spectator, 22 August 1914: THE Times of Wednesday published a piece of news in regard to the final interview between Sir Edward Goschen, our Ambassador at Berlin, and… Continue reading The post The Spectator at war: The scrap of paper that was worth a war appeared first on Spectator Blogs.

Panama Schmanama

As I was listening to Alistair Darling banging on about Scottish independence on the radio the other day, I made a mental note to find out more about the central American country of Panama. Because the gist of Alistair's argument was that without the support our neighbours and friends in England, Scotland is little more than a banana republic. Show More Summary

Mr Clegg goes to Hollywood

There’s going to be film about Nick Clegg. Being a Channel Four film, it’ll be all earnest and serious and political. Which, frankly, sounds boring. There’s quite enough media product in the world about middle-aged politicos in suits hanging around Westminster talking about politics (quite a lot of it written by me, as it happens). [...]

What makes some British Muslims become jihadis?

"The experience of many ages proves that men may be ready to fight to the death, and to persecute without pity, for a religion whose creed they do not understand, and whose precepts they habitually disobey." So wrote Thomas Babbington Macaulay, the Whig MP, historian and poet, in 1848; and, as usual, he was spot [...]

What I've learned in my first year in the House of Lords

The House of Lords is now in recess for more than two months and I have been a peer for a year. I’ve found there are difficult practical aspects of being a lone peer, and have made a lot of mistakes, but when I look back I see that it has become easier. I have [...]

David Herdson wonders how much we can trust the referendum polls

From Prof John Curtice's site – WhatScotsThink most recent #indyref poll of polls pic.twitter.com/BVdRwjNQcu — Mike Smithson (@MSmithsonPB) August 22, 2014 How effective are the pollsters with such a one-off event? Knowledge, information...Show More Summary

Housebuilding is up: is that good news?

Good news on housing: this government is building more homes. New figures from the Communities and Local Government department show housing starts in the second quarter of 2014 increased by… Continue reading The post Housebuilding is up: is that good news? appeared first on Spectator Blogs.

Copyright © 2011 Regator, LLC