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Search Results : Large Hadron Collider


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Google ME View: Giant now lets anyone map their surroundings and upload them using a smartphone

Google’s Street View project has mapped the landmarks of Venice, the interiors of train stations and even the Large Hadron Collider. But now anyone can document views of their favourite locations, which might not have been visited by Google’s cameras. Show More Summary

Large Hadron Collider Pop-Up

Papadakis publishers have released the Higgs edition of their unique publication – the result of a collaboration between the home of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN and renowned paper engineer Anton Radevsky. Radevsky’s previous pop-ups include The Modern Architecture Pop-Up Book, The Pop-Up Book Of Space Craft and The Wild West Pop-Up Book. Show More Summary

Make your own Google Street View scene, giant camera not required

Google's Street View has let us virtually explore the heights of the Eiffel Tower, the depths of the Large Hadron Collider and the world's train stations, but there are places on the globe that remain hidden from Mountain View's all-seeing camera....

A 60-Year-Old Technology Offers A Solution To A Modern Problem

When physicists switch on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), between three and six gigabytes of data spew out of it every second. That is, admittedly, an extreme example. But the flow of data from smaller sources than CERN, the European particle-research organisation outside Geneva that runs the LHC, is also growing inexorably. Show More Summary

A Collision Course

Prospero’s J.P. gives a rave review to “Collider,” a new exhibition at the Science Museum in London about the Large Hadron Collider (LHC): Admirably, the curators do not shy away from the notoriously complicated science the LHC was designed to shed light on—not just the Higgs boson, but also other outstanding physical puzzles like how […]

Step Into The Large Hadron Collider At The Science Museum

last yearEngland / London : Londonist

Is this everything you'd ever want to know about one of the greatest science experiments?

Tired of Goldieblox girl power? Me too

Why does there have to be a great divide between drawing pretty pink princesses and building the Large Hadron Collider?

Searching for cosmic accelerators via IceCube

In our universe there are particle accelerators 40 million times more powerful than the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Scientists don't know what these cosmic accelerators are or where they are located, but new results being reported from "IceCube," the neutrino observatory buried at the South Pole, may show the way. Show More Summary

Coming soon: The Very Large Hadron Collider?

last yearOdd : Boing Boing

What comes after the Large Hadron Collider? Obviously, the answer is a Very Large Hadron Collider. At least, that's what some physicists are hoping for.

Snowmass: Let us Have the Very Large Hadron Collider!

When Europe’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started up in 2008, particle physicists would not have dreamt of asking for something bigger until they got their US$5-billion machine to work. But with the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson,...Show More Summary

It's a Matter of Darkness: Digging Into the Large Hadron Collider Project [Infographic]

You've heard about it before: the Large Hadron Collider, often referred to as "one of the great engineering milestones of mankind," it is also one of the largest, encompassing a 17 mile circumference tube buried 330 feet under the border of France and Switzerland. Show More Summary

Behind the particles: The Guardian goes inside CERN and the Large Hadron Collider

last yearOdd : Boing Boing

What's it like to live and work in the world's most famous physics mecca? Suzanne Moore went to Geneva, Switzerland to meet the scientists who study particle physics at CERN, home of the Large Hadron Collider and the Higgs Boson — and also home to a multinational population that can reach 10,000 at different times of year.

You Don't Have To Enlist To Tour A 50-Year-Old Sub On Street View

Google Street View is slowly becoming the window to a world that most of us may never get to see in real life. And if you’ve already explored every last nook and cranny of CERN’s Large Hadron Collider via Street View, you can now head on over to the UK and poke around the retired HMS Ocelot; a 50-year-old retired Oberon-class submarine. More »      

Around Town - Brian Cox: Making Sense of the Cosmos

21 Oct 2014-22 Oct 2014 Not just a smooth talker, professor Brian Cox is a Royal Society University Research fellow; he works on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider...

Google Street View hits the River Thames

From the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, to zoos and animal parks, Google Street View has long transcended the inherent restrictions imposed by the ‘street’ element in its name. With... Keep reading ?

SMBC reveals the Large Hadron Collider's true purpose

last yearGenres / Sci Fi : io9

What – you didn't really think the LHC was designed to seek out answers to the most confounding questions in all of physics, did you? Read more...

World’s most powerful MRI can lift a tank like Magneto, or see deep into your brain

If you've ever wondered how much energy it takes to perform a full body scan, consider this: a new MRI designed to probe the deep structure of the brain uses a magnet more powerful than the ones inside the Large Hadron Collider.

Peter Higgs Q&A: 'God particle' man wins Nobel Prize in physics

British physicist predicted Higgs boson 50 years before it was observed in Large Hadron Collider Briefing LAST UPDATED AT 14:41 ON Tue 8 Oct 2013 THE Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to Peter Higgs and Francois Englert. The two...Show More Summary

US participation in the Higgs discovery

The search for the Higgs at experiments at the Large Hadron Collider was an international effort involving thousands of people, with physicists and engineers from US institutions playing a significant role throughout. In 2012, the announcement of the Higgs particle rocked the world. Show More Summary

Panoramic Virtual Tour Of CERN Comes To Google Street View

The Large Hadron Collider is the centerpiece of CERN (The European Organization for Nuclear Research). It is the world’s largest laboratory for studying particle physics. Now, thanks to Google Street View, you won’t have to travel to Geneva to understand how it is helping to develop our understanding of the universe we live in. Show More Summary

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