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Mexico hit by second huge quake caused by same tectonic strain

The country has been struck by its second big earthquake in less than two weeks, causing dozens of buildings to collapse

Denmark launches global alliance for action on climate change

COPENHAGEN (Reuters) - A U.S.-based global alliance to speed up efforts to tackle climate change, whose participants inaugural host country Denmark said represented more than a quarter of the world economy, will be launched on Wednesday.

It's a boy! Belgian zoo delighted at Asian elephant's birth

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - A healthy male Asian elephant was born at a Belgian zoo on Tuesday in what keepers say is welcome news for their breeding program after the death of a calf last year.

Image: Proba-V images Salar de Uyuni

Proba-V captures Bolivia's Salar de Uyuni, the world's largest salt plain – its 10 500 sq km make it larger than some countries.

Safe CO2 storage test aids top research project

A new method that inexpensively monitors the safe storage of industrial greenhouse gas emissions is to be used by a leading research project.

Climate change lessons from Arabian Gulf coral reefs

Somewhere on Lake Erie, leaning over the rail of a research vessel in a November snowstorm and trying not to be sick, John Burt decided he'd rather work in warmer waters.

Energy analyst proposes injecting carbon dioxide into deep sea ravines for permanent storage

(Phys.org)—New Zealand energy analyst Steve Goldthorpe has published a paper in the journal Energy Procedia suggesting that carbon dioxide pulled from the atmosphere (or scrubbed from coal plant smoke stacks) could be stored permanently in deep ocean trenches. Show More Summary

Cell phone data coupled with sewage testing show drug use patterns

The drugs people inhale, inject or ingest ultimately end up in some form down the toilet. So scientists have started monitoring drug use through sewage-based epidemiology. But this approach hasn't taken into account the variation in number of people who add to wastewater in a given area at a given time. Show More Summary

Researchers take on atmospheric effects of Arctic snowmelt

Researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks' Geophysical Institute are exploring the changing chemistry of the Arctic's atmosphere to help answer the question of what happens as snow and ice begin to melt.

Gravity waves influence weather and climate

Gravity waves form in the atmosphere as a result of destabilizing processes, for example at weather fronts, during storms or when air masses stroke over mountain ranges. They can occasionally be seen in the sky as bands of cloud. For weather forecast and climate models, however, they are mostly "invisible" due to their short wavelength. Show More Summary

Video: Preserving life on a sand bar

Fighting coastal erosion is one of many sustainability efforts conducted by University of Virginia researchers with the Virginia Coast Reserve Long Term Ecological Research program on Virginia's Eastern Shore.

Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands brace for Hurricane Maria

Hurricane Maria closed in on the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Wednesday as forecasters warned of a "potentially catastrophic" storm that has already killed at least two people in the Caribbean.

Germany to miss EU green energy goal: study

BERLIN (Reuters) - Germany will miss a European Union renewable energy target by a wider margin than previously predicted, a study showed on Wednesday.

New diesel cars no better for environment than petrol cars: report

BERLIN (Reuters) - New diesel cars do not produce less of the environmentally damaging carbon dioxide than petrol cars, a group of newspapers cited the German Transport Ministry as saying on Wednesday, in a potential further headache for the auto sector.

Wind, warm water revved up melting Antarctic glaciers

A NASA study has located the Antarctic glaciers that accelerated the fastest between 2008 and 2014 and finds that the most likely cause of their speedup is an observed influx of warm water into the bay where they're located.

New revelations from Superstorm Sandy data

Five years ago next month, four days before Superstorm Sandy made landfall in New Jersey, Rutgers University-New Brunswick marine scientists launched a data-collecting, submersible robot glider in front of the massive storm.

More local water for Los Angeles could mean a drier Los Angeles River

Local leaders are working to make greater Los Angeles more reliant on local water in order to prepare for a hotter and more crowded future. A UCLA study published today is a reminder that achieving water independence would require a delicate balancing act—in particular for how the region manages the Los Angeles River.

Will Trump's 'Rocket Man' speech lead us to war?

The ostensible purpose of President Trump’s speech at the United Nations on Tuesday was to explain to the world why “America First” is an idea other countries should embrace. It was to be “a deeply philosophical address,” a White House official promised. Instead, the speech will inevitably be remembered...

Mexico's earthquake is a sobering and graphic reminder of what's in store for L.A. someday

There’s a video on Twitter that I can’t stop replaying. An apartment building shivers violently during the magnitude 7.1 earthquake near Mexico City on Tuesday. Without warning, the building collapses into a cloud of dust. It’s shocking in same way that the pancaking of the two World Trade Center...

Essential Politics: Trump talks tough, Brown's water plan gets walloped

President Trump left some world leaders speechless. Congress has healthcare watchers on the edge of their seats over a late attempt to repeal Obamacare. And a Central Valley water district puts Gov. Jerry Brown’s ambitious plumbing plan in danger. There’s a lot to cover across the nation and here...

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