Trend Results : "Craig Venter"


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Artificial cell designed in lab reveals genes essential to life

Bacterium created in Craig Venter's lab breaks record for smallest genome and could help reveal secrets of life

San Diego to Be Research Hub for New Human Vaccines Project

The University of California, San Diego, J. Craig Venter Institute, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and The Scripps Research Institute have teamed up to create the "Mesa Consortium," a new scientific hub for the Human Vaccines Project. Show More Summary

Let There Be Life: The Stakes Raised in Race to Create, Harness Synthetic Life

Genomics entrepreneur Craig Venter has created a synthetic cell that contains the smallest genome of any known, independent organism. Functioning with 473 genes, the cell is a milestone in his team’s 20-year quest to reduce life to its bare essentials and, by extension, to design life from scratch. link.

Syn 3.0 – A Model T Chassis For Synthetic Biology.

J.Craig Venter Institute team Mike Magee A decade or so ago, I had the opportunity to moderate an educational forum that featured Craig Venter. Venter was relatively fresh off of the competitive race to define the human genome, a scientific battle that ended in a truce with current NIH director, Francis Collins. Show More Summary

Engineering A Minimal Genome

Craig Venter’s team has crossed another milestone in their quest to engineer artificial life – they have engineered a bacterium that can survive and reproduce with just 473 genes. This is the smallest genome of any free-living thing (so that does not include viruses). The purpose of this is to create a minimal starting point […]

Artificial cell designed in lab reveals genes essential to life

Bacteria created in Craig Venter's lab breaks record for smallest genome and could help reveal secrets of life

21ST CENTURY HEADLINES: The Mystery of the Minimal Cell, Craig Venter’s New Synthetic Life Form….

21ST CENTURY HEADLINES: The Mystery of the Minimal Cell, Craig Venter’s New Synthetic Life Form.

This Week’s Awesome Stories From Around the Web (Through March 26)

SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY: Scientists Synthesize Bacteria With Smallest Genome Yet Ewen Callaway | Scientific American "Genomics entrepreneur Craig Venter has created a synthetic cell that contains the smallest genome of any known, independent organism. Show More Summary

The Mystery of the Minimal Cell, Craig Venter’s New Synthetic Life Form

Scientists have created a synthetic organism that possesses only the genes it needs to survive. But they have no idea what roughly a third of those genes do. The post The Mystery of the Minimal Cell, Craig Venter's New Synthetic Life Form appeared first on WIRED.

Smallest-yet genome reveals how little we know about life — synthetic or real

In trying to build the simplest life form possible, Craig Venter and a team of scientists reveal life's truly exquisite complexity.

How many synthetic genes does it take to sustain life?

By nailing down the genetic ingredients for life, synthetic biologists at the J. Craig Venter Institute may have redefined the rules for what's essential for survival. Continue reading ? The post How many synthetic genes does it take to sustain life? appeared first on PBS NewsHour.

Scientists synthesize the shortest known genome necessary for life

Chipping away at the genome of a tiny parasitic bacteria, genetic-sequencing trailblazer J. Craig Venter and colleagues say they’ve synthesized the shortest-known genome known to support life. This man-made set of genetic instructions contains only 473 genes, breaking the record held by the bacteria...

Craig Venter Just Hacked Bacteria To Have The Smallest Genome Possible

4 months agoTechnology : Forbes: Tech

A team lead by the biologist J. Craig Venter has created, in the laboratory, a species of bacteria with a genetic code smaller than any known to exist in nature–basically creating a new organism with a minimal code necessary for lif...

Craig Venter’s Synthetic Genome 3.0 Evokes Classic Experiments

J. Craig Venter and his colleagues ?at Synthetic Genomics Inc update their efforts to create a “hypothetical minimal genome” in this week’s Science. “JCVI-syn3.0,” or syn3.0 for short, is about 531,000 base pairs organized into 473 genes,

TSRI and JCVI scientists find popular stem cell techniques safe

LA JOLLA, CA - February 19, 2016 - A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) shows that the act of creating pluripotent stem cells for clinical use is unlikely toShow More Summary

What Makes a Bacterial Species Able to Cause Human Disease?

An international team of scientists, led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), have created the first comprehensive, cross-species genomic comparison of all...Show More Summary

UK Will Use CRISPR on Human Embryos — a Step Closer to Human Genome Editing

"It is human nature and inevitable in my view that we will edit our genomes for enhancements.” —J. Craig Venter This week, Kathy Niakan, a biologist working at the Francis... read more The post UK Will Use CRISPR on Human Embryos — a Step Closer to Human Genome Editing appeared first on Singularity HUB.

10 Weekend Reads

Pour yourself a strong cup of joe, settle in to your favorite chair, and enjoy our longer-form weekend reads: • The Inside Story of Uber’s Radical Rebranding (Wired) • What’s Wrong With Craig Venter? The multi-millionaire maverick, says...Show More Summary

What’s Wrong With Craig Venter?

On the eve of his 69th birthday, Craig Venter looks on, amused, as his digital doppelganger shuffles from foot to foot. Venter’s white-bearded avatar is the star of an iPad app being demonstrated to me by his head of informatics, Scott Skellenger. Show More Summary

New US Company Lets You See Into Your Medical Future For Just $US25,000

Biotech visionary and entrepreneur Craig Venter, famous for inventing a technique to sequence his own genome back in the 1990s, has embarked on a new venture. For $US25,000, his startup Human Longevity will give you every possible futuristic medical test, potentially revealing your risk for Alzheimer’s. More »      

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