Trend Results : "Prostate Cancer"


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MRI twice as likely as biopsy to spot prostate cancer, research shows

Finding could bring about change of practice in NHS with ‘potential to save many lives’, says charity Every man with suspected prostate cancer should have an MRI scan, which is twice as likely to identify the presence of dangerous tumours as the invasive biopsy used currently, say doctors. Show More Summary

Far fewer men being treated for prostate cancer

8 hours agoHealth : Reuters: Health

(Reuters Health) - The number of older Americans treated for prostate cancer plummeted 42 percent since health officials began questioning the benefits of screening tests, a new study shows.

Markers for prostate cancer death can identify men in need of more aggressive treatment

A prostate specific antigen (PSA) nadir greater than 0.5 ng/mL following radiation and androgen deprivation therapy appears to identify men prior to PSA failure who are at high-risk for dying early as a result of treatment failure for their prostate cancer, research shows.

Does recent randomized prostate cancer trial provide insights on best treatment?

(Wiley) For the first time, we now have a randomized trial comparing active monitoring, surgery, and radiation therapy for the management of localized prostate cancer.

Markers for prostate cancer death can identify men in need of more aggressive treatment

(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital found that a prostate specific antigen (PSA) nadir greater than 0.5 ng/mL following radiation and androgen deprivation therapy, appears to identify men prior to PSA failure who are at high-risk for dying early as a result of treatment failure for their prostate cancer.

Augmenix Announces Positive Three-Year Long-Term Data Highlighting Benefits of SpaceOAR® Hydrogel Spacer for Patients with Prostate Cancer

PRESS RELEASE: Augmenix, Inc., a medical technology company that develops, manufactures, and sells proprietary absorbable hydrogels that separate and protect organs at risk during prostate radiotherapy, announced that the International Journal of Radiation...

Study: For Men with Prostate Cancer, Emotional Distress May Lead to More Aggressive Treatment

The anxiety many men experience after being diagnosed with prostate cancer may lead them to choose potentially unnecessary treatment options, researchers from the University at Buffalo and Roswell Park Cancer Institute report in a new study.

Unique Gene Signature Predicts Potentially Lethal Prostate Cancers

Standard therapy for prostate cancer, the third-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men, is based on blocking androgens, the male sex hormones. However, for some men, prostate cancer recurs despite androgen-deprivation therapy. Show More Summary

Aggressive prostate cancer secrets revealed in landmark study

A landmark study has revealed the reason why men with a family history of prostate cancer who also carry the BRCA2 gene fault have a more aggressive form of prostate cancer.

Researchers find genetic fingerprint for spotting aggressive prostate cancer

DNA discovery will allow for more customized care for men diagnosed with prostate cancer The post Researchers find genetic fingerprint for spotting aggressive prostate cancer appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Aggressive prostate cancer secrets revealed in landmark study

(Monash University) A landmark study, led by Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute with the involvement of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, has revealed the reason why men with a family history of prostate cancer who also carry the BRCA2 gene fault have a more aggressive form of prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer treatment rates drop, reflecting change in screening recommendations

(University of Michigan Health System) As some national guidelines now recommend against routine prostate cancer screening, the overall rate of men receiving treatment for the disease declined 42 percent, a new study finds.

Prostate Cancer Team Cracks Genetic Code to Show Why Inherited Disease Can Turn Lethal

Canadian and Australian prostate cancer researchers have discovered a key piece in the genetic puzzle of why men born with a BRCA2 mutation may develop aggressive localized cancers that resist treatment and become lethal for up to 50 per cent of patients within five years.

Prostate Cancer Researchers Discover Genetic Fingerprint to Identify How and When Disease Initially Spreads

Canadian prostate cancer researchers have discovered the genetic fingerprint that explains why up to 30 per cent of men with potentially curable localized prostate cancer develop aggressive disease that spreads following radiotherapy or surgery.

Genomic hallmarks of localized, non-indolent prostate cancer

Genomic analyses of localized, non-indolent prostate cancer identify recurrent aberrations that can predict relapse, and also highlight differences between early prostate cancer and metastatic, castration-resistant disease.

New therapeutic agent proves more effective treatment for advanced prostate cancer

Medical researchers have demonstrated that lutetium-177-labeled PSMA-617 is a promising new therapeutic agent for radioligand therapy of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

Research helps explain why androgen-deprivation therapy doesn't work for many prostate cancers

Metastatic prostate cancer, or prostate cancer that has spread to other organs, is incurable. In new research, scientists have identified two gatekeeper genes that allow prostate cancer to progress and resist treatment. Their work illuminates...Show More Summary

Research helps explain why androgen-deprivation therapy doesn't work for many prostate cancers

(Roswell Park Cancer Institute) Metastatic prostate cancer, or prostate cancer that has spread to other organs, is incurable. In new research published in the journal Science, Roswell Park Cancer Institute scientists have identified two gatekeeper genes that allow prostate cancer to progress and resist treatment. Show More Summary

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