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It would be like a "sharknado." With knives.

2 days agoHumor / odd : TYWKIWDBI

The photo above shows an area of ground in Chile's Atacama desert "paved" with large gypsum crystals. Geologists now believe these surface concentrations originate as depositions by "dust devils."Whirlwinds, dry convective helical vortices, move large gypsum crystals in the Andes Mountains of northern Chile. Show More Summary

Animals dug this burrow

last weekHumor / odd : TYWKIWDBI

Big ones, obviously. Probably (extinct) giant sloths.Across northern South America, there are hundreds of colossal tunnels large enough for humans to walk through... Geologists call these tunnels “paleoburrow,” and they are believed to have been dug by an extinct species of giant ground sloth... Show More Summary

Geologist believes Grand Canyon was caused by Noah’s flood — so he’s suing the Park Service to prove it

2 weeks agoNews : The Raw Story

According to an article by the Daily Beast, an Australian geologist who identifies as a “young-earth creationist” is suing the National Parks Service so he can remove rocks from the Grand Canyon in an attempt to prove that the Biblical flood happened there. Dr. Andrew Snelling, the...

New Andaz Mayakoba Offers a Bit of Tropical Magic on the Riviera Maya

Conceived by architects, biologists and geologists, Mayakoba is a gated, resort development whose aim is to enhance its environment while preserving nature.... via JustLuxe.com

Meet NASA's 12 new astronauts

2 weeks agoTechnology : Tech Talk

A surgeon, two geologists, a nuclear engineer, and four veteran test pilots are among the latest class of NASA astronauts

The Oldest Human Fossils Ever Discovered Have Stories to Tell

The first fossil skeleton of a human ever discovered was found, in 1823, in southern Wales, ceremonially buried under six inches of soil in a limestone cave facing the sea. William Buckland, the Oxford geologist who unearthed it, didn’t know what he had come upon. Show More Summary

Laurel Dinosaur Park in Laurel, Maryland

During the 18 th and 19 th centuries, clay formations in Prince George's County, Maryland were mined for iron. In 1858, at one such iron mine, African-American slaves removed odd, unfamiliar objects from the ground. Geologist PhilipShow More Summary

Watch Animal Collective Record Their New EP in the Brazilian Rainforest

Last year, Animal Collective recorded the entirety of their recent Meeting of the Waters EP live in the Brazilian rainforest. A new Viceland documentary series called “Earthworks” captures Geologist, Avey Tare, and sound engineer Sonny Diperri in the process of creating the project. Show More Summary

Bad Signs

What happens when a geologist with a Sharpie encounters wrong information on a public sign? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

A Creationist Wants Rocks to Study. The Grand Canyon Says No.

A lawsuit by a creationist geologist brings to light a dispute between science and religion at Grand Canyon National Park.

Geologists and engineers puzzle over how to remove a million tons of rock and dirt from Highway 1

After Saturday's catastrophic land failure buried part of Highway 1 along the Big Sur coastline, geologists and engineers are trying to find a fix. Don't expect an opening any time soon.

Supercomputing helps researchers understand Earth's interior

(University of Illinois College of Liberal Arts & Sciences) University of Illinois geologist Lijun Liu and his team have created a computer model of tectonic activity so effective that they believe it has potential to predict where earthquakes and volcanoes will occur. Show More Summary

Man sues Grand Canyon for not letting him study its rocks

A geologist is suing the Grand Canyon because park authorities wouldn't allow him to remove a bunch of rocks from the historic site to aid in his research. Read more...

Elaine J. Hanford's Bulletin Boards: 1) Geosciences; 2) Environmental Sciences; 3) Coastal Zone Management - 15 May 2017

last monthUtilities / Water : WaterWired

Thanks to Elaine for sending me Dr. David Burton 'Burt' Slemmons' obituary. Burt, a longtime UNR faculty member, was a remarkable geologist and a terribly nice guy - a scholar and a gentleman to be sure! Read about Burt here. Here is the link to the weekly water news and...

Rice U.'s Yellow River formula addresses flood risk, sustainability

(Rice University) Rice University geologists studying China's Yellow River have created a new tool that could help Chinese engineers and river managerial officials better predict and prevent the river's all-too-frequent floods, which threaten as many as 80 million people.

Yellow River formula addresses flood risk, sustainability

U.S. and Chinese geologists studying China's Yellow River have created a new tool that could help Chinese officials better predict and prevent the river's all-too-frequent floods, which threaten as many as 80 million people. The new tool, a physics-based formulation to calculate sediment transport, can also be applied to study the sustainability of eroding coastlines worldwide.

These Bright Streaks Are Evidence of Massive Tornadoes on Mars

Peter Schultz likes to go on "tours of Mars" in his spare time. The Brown University geologist scans random images of the red planet from NASA satellites and looks for interesting surface features that may be worth more study. It was on one of these tours that Schultz noticed bright streaks radiating from an impact crater. Show More Summary

Deeper understanding of environmental values gained through broader collaboration

It's understood that chemists and geologists come from very different science disciplines, but people tend to file all social scientists under one category—social. But within the social sciences, a psychologist is very different from an anthropologist or an economist. Show More Summary

Ancient Mars impacts created tornado-like winds that scoured surface

In looking at NASA images of Mars a few years ago, Brown University geologist Peter Schultz noticed sets of strange bright streaks emanating from a few large-impact craters on the planet's surface. The streaks are odd in that they extend much farther from the craters than normal ejecta patterns, and they are only visible in thermal infrared images taken during the Martian night.

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