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HKU geologist Zhao Guochun, first Hong Kong scholar to win TWAS Prize in Earth, Astronomy and Space Sciences

(The University of Hong Kong) Professor Zhao Guochun from the Department of Earth Sciences, the University of Hong Kong was awarded the 2018 TWAS Prize in Earth, Astronomy and Space Sciences.

Scientists home in on a potential Anthropocene 'golden spike'

The international working group, which includes geologists Jan Zalasiewicz, Mark Williams and Colin Waters, from the University of Leicester's School of Geography, Geology and the Environment and archaeologist Matt Edgeworth has, since...Show More Summary

Fossils of Folkestone, Kent by Philip Hadland

A Review of the Fossils of Folkestone, Kent Fossil collecting is a popular hobby and there are a number of excellent general guide books available.  However, the newly published "Fossils of Folkestone, Kent" by geologist and museum curator Philip Hadland, takes a slightly different perspective.  Instead of focusing on lots of fossil collecting locations, Philip

Earthquakes as a driver for the deep-ocean carbon cycle

An international team led by geologist Michael Strasser has used novel methods to analyze sediment deposits in the Japan Trench in order to gain new insights into the carbon cycle.

Panda Bear announces world tour w/ his homie Geologist, reassures us that A Day With the Homies is STILL coming out this Friday on Domino

Psssssssssssssssst. Hey. Hey. Hey, NOAH… Wake up! Get your booty OVER HERE, quick! Uhh…Did you already FORGET that you announced this past fall that your new vinyl-only EP A Day with the Homies was coming out on January 12??? That’s, like, THIS FRIDAY, dude! Whoa, whoa, whoa. Show More Summary

Looking Back at Ten Years of Geotripping: "They're, uh...They're Not a Very Exciting People, Those Geologists"

I borrowed the quote in the title from a Cracked.com article (referenced below) as a starting point to some musings about the adventures in life that are possible for people who don't happen to be astronauts or Himalayan mountain-climbers. Show More Summary

A Look Back at Ten Years of Geotripping: Geotripper Rates Hollywood Movie Geologists

This week is the tenth anniversary of Geotripper, so I am dredging up some of my favorite posts from over the years. During the early days of geoblogging, there was a monthly carnival called the Accretionary Wedge, where bloggers and commenters tackled particular geological issues. Show More Summary

We could see twice as many big earthquakes this year, scientists warn — because the equator has shrunk

Geologists predict the Earth could see about twice as many earthquakes this year. That's because the world is turning a little slower than usual, prompting the equator to shrink slightly. A "skinny" equator makes the edges of tectonic...Show More Summary

60-Million-Year-Old Meteor Strike Uncovered on Remote Isle of Skye

A team of geologists from Birkbeck, University of London was examining volcanic rocks on the remote Isle of Skye in Scotland when they uncovered rare minerals that have never before been found on Earth, according to a study that was published Dec. Show More Summary

Superheroes Are Bad for the Environment According to a New Study

3 weeks agoEntertainment / Film : MovieWeb

Stanford University geologist Miles Traer doesn't think earth could handle real superheroes.

Will Yellowstone erupt? Geologists look for supervolcano’s heat source

3 weeks agoNews : The Raw Story

The Yellowstone volcano is a complicated system that is hard to predict, but scientists are getting closer to understanding the source of its heat. A team of researchers says the supervolcano doesn’t conform to a common idea: that a plume of magma below the surface delivers the heat necessary to...

Skye high impact: Geologists in Scotland discover a 60-million-year-old meteorite strike

(Geological Society of America) Geologists exploring volcanic rocks on Scotland's Isle of Skye found something out-of-this-world instead: ejecta from a previously unknown, 60 million-year-old meteorite impact. The discovery, the first...Show More Summary

Geologists report new discoveries about Kansas, Oklahoma earthquakes

As concern rises about earthquakes induced by human activity like oil exploration, geologists at the University of Kansas report a new understanding about recent earthquakes in Kansas and Oklahoma. This breakthrough may one day leadShow More Summary

Geologists in Scotland discover a 60-million-year-old meteorite strike

Geologists exploring volcanic rocks on Scotland's Isle of Skye found something out-of-this-world instead: ejecta from a previously unknown, 60 million-year-old meteorite impact. The discovery, the first meteorite impact described within...Show More Summary

New research improves understanding of ancient landscapes

(University of Texas at Austin) Geologists use zircon mineral grains to reconstruct what the Earth and its landscapes looked like in ancient times. A new study led by The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences suggests...Show More Summary

New research improves understanding of ancient landscapes

Geologists use zircon mineral grains to reconstruct what the Earth and its landscapes looked like in ancient times. These microscopic grains, commonly the width of a human hair, record detailed information on when and where they formed, making them a standard tool for studying how our planet has changed through the ages.

Down to Earth With: Volcanologist Jess Phoenix

Field geologists usually love camping, hiking and all things outdoors. Today, Jess Phoenix is no different, but she wasn’t always that way. As a child growing up in Colorado, she bucked traditional backpack-wearing pursuits. “I would take the horses on trail rides and that was probably the most outdoorsy thing that I did,” Phoenix says. Show More Summary

The First Scientist to Study Dinosaur Footprints Thought Giant Birds Made Them

Gigantic flightless birds roamed New England in the Jurassic. At least that was the hypothesis proposed by 19th-century geologist and natural theologian Professor Edward Hitchcock, based on the thousands of fossilized three-toed footprints he found all over the Connecticut Valley. Show More Summary

Federal geologists to reevaluate North Dakota oil potential

Federal geologists agreed Monday to reevaluate the amount of recoverable crude oil in North Dakota, U.S. Senator John Hoeven said. Hoeven and industry officials requested the new assessment by the … Click to Continue »

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