Trend Results : American College of Cardiology


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Exercise: Any Intensity Level Makes a Difference!

A study from the American College of Cardiology’s Sports and Exercise Cardiology Council concludes that consistent exercise is crucial for heart health. The study authors remarked on how only half of American adults get the federally recommended 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity exercise per week. They analyzed some recent data and discovered […]

New guidance on preventing sudden cardiac death in athletes published

The Journal of the American College of Cardiology today published a consensus statement that establishes guidance for conducting pre-participation screenings of college athletes and encourages emergency action plans for quickly responding to sudden cardiac arrest. Show More Summary

#ACC16: Proteus' Digital Medicine Offering Leads To Improved Compliance And Lower Blood Pressure

Interim findings from a new Digital Medicines study presented yesterday at the 65th annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology (#ACC16)demonstrated that patients benefit from feedback on medication adherence and behavior patterns, translating to improved outcomes for chronic medical conditions such as diabetes and hypertension. The study included patients using [...]

Stem cell therapy improves outcomes in severe heart failure

CHICAGO (April 4, 2016) -- A new stem cell therapy significantly improved long-term health outcomes in patients with severe and end-stage heart failure in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. read more

Family plays important role in heart health throughout life

Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and the burden is increasing - much of which could be reduced through modifiable risk factors. A new review in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology examines the roleShow More Summary

US prediction models for kidney injury following angioplasty hold up in Japan

Models developed by the American College of Cardiology NCDR CathPCI Registry to predict the likelihood of angioplasty patients developing acute kidney injury and acute kidney injury requiring dialysis have proven to be effective among patients in Japan. Show More Summary

Cardiology Leaders from NYU Langone Medical Center Recognized by American College of Cardiology

Judith Hochman, MD, was awarded the ACC's Distinguished Scientist Award in the Clinical Domain in honor of her contributions to the cardiovascular profession, and Sripal Bangalore, MD, was awarded the Douglas P. Zipes Distinguished Young Scientist Award in honor of his contributions to cardiovascular research. Show More Summary

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai to Present New Findings at American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions 2016

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai will present their Late-Breaking Clinical Trial findings and other important research results advancing the field of cardiovascular medicine at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session and Expo

Renowned North Texas Cardiac Expert Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

William C. Roberts MD, executive director of the Baylor Heart and Vascular Institute (BHVI), has been awarded the 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) for his contributions to the cardiovascular profession.

Study explores carb-loading's effect on the heart

Drinking a high carbohydrate shake can have an acute and detrimental effect on heart function, a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) has found. read more

CRF physicians and fellows to present abstracts at ACC.16

New York, NY - March 29, 2016 - Physicians and fellows from the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will be presenting abstracts at the American College of Cardiology 65th Annual Scientific Session taking place April 2-4, 2016 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL. Show More Summary

Long naps, daytime sleepiness tied to greater risk of metabolic syndrome

Taking long naps or being excessively tired during the day is associated with a higher risk for developing metabolic syndrome, according to a study scheduled for presentation at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. read more

Vascular disease after age 80 associated with greater risk of dementia

People who reach their 80s without cardiovascular disease are more likely to suffer from the effects of dementia than a heart attack or stroke, according to a study today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. In a small...Show More Summary

Registry data used to examine gender gaps in blood thinners, appropriate use

WASHINGTON (Feb. 12, 2016) - The American College of Cardiology's National Cardiovascular Data Registry was the source of data for several research studies published in the final three months of 2015, including a study examining outcomes...Show More Summary

New Online Tool Allows Patients to Make Better Informed Cardiac Care Decisions

MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute at MedStar Washington Hospital Center has partnered with the American College of Cardiology's Find Your Heart a Home(tm) pilot program, a campaign aimed at helping patients make informed choices about where to receive their cardiac care. It is one of only two hospitals in the nation selected to participate in the program.

Societies release recommendations for diagnosing chest pain in the emergency department

WASHINGTON (Jan. 22, 2016) -- New recommendations from the American College of Cardiology and American College of Radiology have established appropriate use of diagnostic imaging for patients with chest pain, one of the most common reasons for emergency department visits. read more

Regular Exercise Critical for Heart Health, Longevity

American College of Cardiology Sports and Exercise Cardiology Council encourages physical activity for heart disease prevention.

Exercise reduces heart disease risk in depressed patients

WASHINGTON (Jan. 11, 2015) -- Symptoms of mild to minimal depression were associated with early indicators of heart disease in a research letter published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, but the study found regular exercise seems to reduce the adverse cardiovascular consequences of depression. read more

PatientsLikeMe, American College of Cardiology Partner on Diabetes Collaborative Registry

The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and patient active network PatientsLikeMe have launched a partnership to explore innovative ways to make real-world patient feedback and experience more central to diabetes research and care.Show More Summary

How Childhood Stress Affects Future Health

NPR just reported a new study that points to the importance of helping children name and manage their emotions. The study reported in the Journal of American College of Cardiology found that emotional distress during childhood, evenShow More Summary

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