Discover a new way to find and share stories you'll love… Learn about Reading Desk

Trend Results : American College of Cardiology


Blog Post Results (1-20 of 276)

FILTER RESULTS

Survival rates higher in obese heart failure patients

Patients who were obese before developing heart failure lived longer than normal weight patients with the same condition according to a new study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the "obesity paradox" by following obese and non-obese heart failure patients for more than a decade. read more

"The Next Big Things" in Cardiovascular Medicine

More than 2,000 experts in the field of cardiovascular medicine will attend the annual American College of Cardiology 47th New York Cardiovascular Symposium December 12-14 at the New York Hilton-Midtown, which will highlight "The Next Big Things" in cardiovascular medicine.

Low levels of HEA prohormone predict coronary heart disease

Men with low levels of DHEA in the blood run an increased risk of developing coronary heart disease events. The Sahlgrenska Academy study has been published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The term prohormone refers to the precursor of a hormone. Show More Summary

Most older adults qualify for statin therapy under new cholesterol guidelines, study show

Nearly all individuals in their late 60s and early 70s now qualify for a statin medication to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease under the recently released cholesterol guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association, an expert outlines.

For obese people, an increased risk of ‘silent’ heart damage, study says

2 months agoHealth : The Checkup

Researchers from Johns Hopkins have identified a new risk for obese people: silent heart damage. In a study published in the October edition of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Heart Failure, the investigators found evidence that obesity is an "independent driver of heart muscle damage." Read full article >>

Report: Performance measures should include patient actions

WASHINGTON (Nov. 3, 2014) — The actions — or inaction — of patients should be considered in programs designed to improve care and patient outcomes, according to a report released today by the American College of Cardiology, AmericanShow More Summary

A Gut Bacteria Compound Is Linked To Heart Failure

3 months agoHealth : Healthland

Most Americans know that diet and heart health are connected, but a new study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology looks at a surprising reason as to why. When your food gets to your stomach, your gut bacteria get to work. And when those bacteria digest carnitine, which is almost exclusively found…

Jersey Shore University Medical Center & Riverview Medical Center Receive American College of Cardiology Award

Meridian Health's Jersey Shore University Medical Center and Riverview Medical Center have received the American College of Cardiology's NCDR ACTION Registry-GWTG Silver Performance Achievement Award for 2014.

American College of Cardiology removes one of its choosing wisely recommendations in light of recent evidence

From an ACC news release: In response to new science showing that complete revascularization of all significantly blocked arteries leads to better outcomes in some heart attack patients, the American College of Cardiology has withdrawn...Show More Summary

Loyola Receives Platinum Award for Heart Attack Care

Loyola University Medical Center has received the American College of Cardiology's Platinum Performance Achievement Award for 2014. Loyola is one of only 256 hospitals nationwide to receive the honor.

Top stories in health and medicine, September 24, 2014

From MedPage Today: Key Updates for Angina, NSTEMI. The American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology released an update of their guidelines for unstable angina and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Show More Summary

UVA Honored for Improving Heart Attack Care

The University of Virginia Health System has earned a national award from the American College of Cardiology for enhancing care for heart attack patients. UVA is one of just 55 U.S. hospitals to receive the ACTION Registry-Get With The Guidelines Gold Performance Achievement Award.

Task force challenges some recommendations in updated cholesterol treatment guideline

A Mayo Clinic task force challenges some recommendations in the updated guideline for cholesterol treatment unveiled by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) in 2013. The task force concludes,Show More Summary

Mayo Clinic Task Force Challenges Some Recommendations in Updated Cholesterol Treatment Guideline

A Mayo Clinic task force challenges some recommendations in the updated guideline for cholesterol treatment unveiled by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) in 2013. The task force concludes,Show More Summary

ABIM Placates Physician Anti-MOC Sentiment with "Commitments"

6 months agoIndustries / Medical : Dr. Wes

From the 5 Aug 2014 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC): "Note: There is evidence that the ABIM has heard the concerns of its diplomats and is acting responsively. In a July 10, 2014 letter to the internal medicine...Show More Summary

Well: Advice From a Vegan Cardiologist

6 months agoHealth : NYT: Health

Dr. Kim A. Williams, the president-elect of the American College of Cardiology, saw his cholesterol numbers plummet after adopting a vegan diet, and he advises many of his patients to go vegan.

Study: Running 5 Minutes a Day Could Add Years to Your Life

6 months agoHealth : Healthland

According to a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, running 5 minutes per day can reduce an individual’s risk of premature death by about 3 years. Researchers found that people who ran less than an hour per week also saw an increase in lifespan, not just a decrease in…

Want to Live Longer? Go for a Run, Says Iowa State Researcher

Need an incentive to go for a run? A new Iowa State University study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, found running for just five to 10 minutes a day can significantly reduce your risk of death from cardiovascular disease.

Running as little as 30 minutes a week reduces your risk of early death

6 months agoOdd : Boing Boing

"Three's a crowd" by Thomas Rousing, a photo shared in the Boing Boing Flickr Pool. A study released this week in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that participants who ran less than one hour each week received the same health benefits as people who ran more. Read the rest

Copyright © 2011 Regator, LLC