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Batavia's mysteries unfold with discovery of mass grave

An international team of archaeologists, including scientists from The University of Western Australia and the Western Australian Museum, has discovered a new communal grave in the Abrolhos Islands, the result of deaths after a shipwreck of the Dutch East India company ship Batavia.

Fancy chariot and horse burial found in central China

Archaeologists have found four ancient chariots and the remains of nearly 100 horses buried in a tomb in Xinzheng City, Henan province, central China. The chariots date to the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 B.C.) and one of them in particular is an exceptional example of a luxurious vehicle with all the bells and whistles […]

Antimony may have poisoned Pompeii's drinking water

The ancient Romans may have had advanced water distribution systems, but the water pipes they used were highly toxic. Many Roman-era water pipes were lined with lead, leading some archaeologists to suspect a public health crisis among Romans that may have contributed to the empire’s eventual fall. Show More Summary

3,000-year-old underwater castle discovered in Turkey's largest lake

Lake Van is largest lake in Turkey - but that isn't its only claim to fame. Van Yüzüncü Yil University archaeologists and a team of divers recently discovered an underwater fortress there. The ancient nation of Urartu could have built the castle roughly around 3,000 years ago during the Iron Age.[...]

Desecrated in macabre ways, the ancestral remains of Catalina's Native Americans finally come home

Nearly a century ago, an amateur archaeologist and showman named Ralph Glidden dug up Native American burial sites on Catalina and other Channel Islands off Southern California’s coast. To him, the human remains and relics were treasures to be displayed in the so-called Indian Museum he opened...

Native Americans use their growing clout to reclaim tribal remains and relics

Nearly a century ago, an amateur archaeologist and showman named Ralph Glidden dug up Native American burial sites on Catalina and other Channel Islands off Southern California’s coast. To him, the human remains and relics were treasures to be displayed in the so-called Indian Museum he opened...

Remains of Viking camp workshops unearthed by Bristol archaeologists

Workshops from a Viking camp dating to the winter of 873-4, have been unearthed by a team of archaeologists from the University of Bristol. The post Remains of Viking camp workshops unearthed by Bristol archaeologists appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Archaeologists Discover Three Roman shipwrecks

Archaeologists in Egypt have announced the discovery of three underwater shipwrecks that date from the Roman Era in Abu Qir Bay, Alexandria. The post Archaeologists Discover Three Roman shipwrecks appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Ancient Roman Shipwrecks Full of Treasure and a 'Royal Head of Crystal' Discovered in Egypt

Archaeologists discovered the trove of artifacts on the Mediterranean seabed near the city of Alexandria.

Archeologists find Roman shipwrecks off Egypt's north coast

Egypt says archaeologists have discovered three sunken shipwrecks dating back more than 2,000 years to Roman times off the coast of the city of Alexandria.

Ancient Russian Dog Sacrifices May Be Origin of Werewolf Myths

Near the banks of the Samara River, archaeologists have been uncovering evidence of a 5000-year-old civilization called Krasnosamarskoe. While ancient settlements in the Ural mountains and Siberian steppes are nothing new, researchers have been discovering evidence of strange rituals and sacrifices that are unlike anything else found in the region. Show More Summary

Biography of Chinese inquisitor found in 13th c. tomb

Archaeologists have discovered a double tomb of a lord and lady of the southern Song Dynasty (1127–1279) in China’s southeastern Zhejiang province. The tombs were unearthed at a contruction site in Qingyuan County in 2014 but the findings have only now been published in English in the journal Chinese Cultural Relics, a translation of the […]

Gold artefacts from Tutankhamun’s tomb researched for first time

Archaeologists examine embossed gold applications from the sensational find of 1922.

Third Roman temple discovery in Silchester may have been part of emperor’s vanity project

A Roman temple uncovered in a Hampshire farmyard by University of Reading archaeologists may be the first building of its kind in Britain to be dated back to the reign of Emperor Nero. The post Third Roman temple discovery in Silchester may have been part of emperor’s vanity project appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

New treasures from Tutankhamun’s tomb

As part of a German-Egyptian project, archaeologists from Tübingen for the first time examine embossed gold applications from the sensational find of 1922. The motifs indicate surprising links between the Levant and the Egypt of the pharaohs. The post New treasures from Tutankhamun’s tomb appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Archaeologists find mysterious, 4,000-year-old dog sacrifices in Russia

Ancient structure full of charred dog bones points to a ritual related to werewolf myths.

19th c. Dutch farmers: A Croc, a Croc, my dairy farm for a Croc!

Archaeologists have discovered evidence in the bones 19th century Dutch farmers that the traditional wooden clogs that are now ubiquitous on key chains and souvenir stands but were once ubiquitous on human feet caused permanent osteological damage. Show More Summary

A Close-Up on Mysteries Made of Stone in Saudi Arabia’s Desert

5 days agoNews : NYTimes: News

Structures that may have been created by ancient tribes could only be studied using Google Earth. Saudi officials finally invited an archaeologist to observe them via helicopter.

Blocked Entrance to Mysterious Mayan Temple Tunnel Found

A bold project in Mexico has brought archaeologists, biologists, underwater photographers and cave divers to the Yucatán Peninsula to study the network of sinkholes known as cenotes that make up the Mayan Aquifer. These natural openings formed by the collapse of the underlying limestone bedrock led the ancient Mayans to what became their primary sources... Read more »

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