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Prosecuting background check and straw purchase violations depends on state laws

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Study examined prosecutions following tougher sentencing for 'straw arm' purchases in Pennsylvania and a Maryland court decision that redefined private firearm transfers.

Prosecuting Background Check and Straw Purchase Violations Depends on State Laws

A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that prosecutions in Pennsylvania for violating the state's straw purchase law increased by nearly 16 times following the 2012 passage of a law requiring a mandatory minimum five-year sentence for individuals convicted of multiple straw purchase violations. Show More Summary

Daniel Webster Named First Bloomberg Professor of American Health

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has appointed a leading national expert in gun violence prevention, Daniel Webster, as its first Bloomberg Professor of American Health, an endowed position supported by the Bloomberg American Health Initiative.

Report: 'Food Desert' Gets a Name Change in Response to Baltimore Community Feedback

In a new report, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for a Livable Future (CLF) detail the rationale behind replacing the term "food desert" with "Healthy Food Priority Areas." The report, which...Show More Summary

Perspective: Let's Put the 'Ph' Back in Science PhD Programs

Today's graduate biomedical science education system is in need of comprehensive reform, two researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health argue in a new paper.

Diet Rich in Apples and Tomatoes May Help Repair Lungs of Ex-Smokers, Study Suggests

A study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found the natural decline in lung function over a 10-year period was slower among former smokers with a diet high in tomatoes and fruits, especially apples, suggesting certain components in these foods might help restore lung damage caused by smoking.

Diet rich in apples and tomatoes may help repair lungs of ex-smokers, study suggests

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found the natural decline in lung function over a 10-year period was slower among former smokers with a diet high in tomatoes and fruits, especially apples, suggesting certain components in these foods might help restore lung damage caused by smoking.

Read Michael Bloomberg’s blistering takedown of the GOP tax plan

Today, Michael Bloomberg took to, well, Bloomberg to excoriate the Republican tax overhaul bill. He writes: The largest economic challenges we face include a skills crisis that our public schools are not addressing, crumbling infrastructure...Show More Summary

Warning Labels Can Help Reduce Soda Consumption and Obesity, New Study Suggests

Labels that warn people about the risks of drinking soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) can lower obesity and overweight prevalence, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study.

Common fungus helps dengue virus thrive in mosquitoes

A species of fungus that lives in the gut of some Aedes aegypti mosquitoes increases the ability of dengue virus to survive in the insects, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The fungus exerts this effect by reducing the production and activity of digestive enzymes in the mosquitoes.

Common fungus helps dengue virus thrive in mosquitoes

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A species of fungus that lives in the gut of some Aedes aegypti mosquitoes increases the ability of dengue virus to survive in the insects, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Children on sex offender registries at greater risk for suicide attempts, study suggests

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that children who were legally required to register as sex offenders were at greater...Show More Summary

Children on Sex Offender Registries at Greater Risk for Suicide Attempts, Study Suggests

A new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that children who were legally required to register as sex offenders were at greater risk for harm, including suicide attempts and sexual assault, compared to a group of children who engaged in harmful or illegal sexual behavior but who were not required to register.

How the Tax Bill Whacks Democrats

Bloomberg: “Some of the biggest losers under the Republican tax overhaul include upper-middle class families in high-tax areas like New York City, graduate students, government workers and public school teachers.” “The one thing they have in common? They’re mostly Democrats.”

Opioid Crisis: Criminal Justice Referrals Miss Treatment Opportunities, Study Suggests

A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that under 5 percent of those referred for opioid treatment from the criminal justice system were directed to medication-assisted programs to treat their disorder.

Opioid crisis: Criminal justice referrals miss treatment opportunities, study suggests

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that under 5 percent of those referred for opioid treatment from the criminal justice system were directed to medication-assisted programs to treat their disorder

Range of opioid prescribers play important role in epidemic, study finds

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A cross-section of opioid prescribers that typically do not prescribe large volumes of opioids, including primary care physicians, surgeons and non-physician health care providers,...Show More Summary

Genetic mutation could, if altered, boost flumist vaccine effectiveness, research suggests

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered a genetic mutation in the FluMist intranasal flu vaccine that has the potential to be altered to enhance the vaccine's protective effect.

Genetic Mutation Could, if Altered, Boost Flumist Vaccine's Effectiveness, Research Suggests

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered a genetic mutation in the FluMist intranasal flu vaccine that has the potential to be altered to enhance the vaccine's protective effect.

A neighborhood's quality influences children's behaviors through teens, study suggests

The quality of the neighborhood where a child grows up has a significant impact on the number of problem behaviors they display during elementary and teenage years, a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests.

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