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A treacherous journey through Bolivia's Amazon

Bolivians risk snake and insect bites harvesting brazil nuts, as lorry drivers face landslides to deliver the nuts.

Well : Heart Healthy in the Amazon

6 months agoHealth : NYTimes: Health

What some Bolivians with the world’s healthiest arteries might tell us about cardiac fitness.

Amazon tribe has the healthiest hearts ever studied

Heart attacks and strokes are virtually unknown among the Tsimane people of the Bolivian rainforest. What can we learn from this?

Monkeys Save Man Lost in Amazon Jungle for Nine Days

For those in need of a feel-good story, this one will have you crying big old monkey tears and give you a reason not to mess with local customs. A tourist lost in a Bolivian rainforest for nine days was able to survive with the help of...

South American tribe boasts healthiest arteries ever studied

7 months agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

An isolated tribe in the Bolivian Amazon has been found to have the healthiest arteries of any population ever studied. The Tsimane (pronounced chee-MAH-nay) are a forager-horticulturist tribe that has been found to have extraordinarily...Show More Summary

Indigenous South American group has healthiest arteries of all populations yet studied, providing clues to healthy lifestyle

An 80 year old from the Tsimane (pronounced chee-MAH-nay) group had the same vascular age as an American in their mid-fifties, suggests a new report. The Tsimane people -- a forager-horticulturalist population of the Bolivian AmazonShow More Summary

The Lancet: Indigenous South American group has healthiest arteries of all populations yet studied, providing clues to healthy lifestyle

(The Lancet) The Tsimane people -- a forager-horticulturalist population of the Bolivian Amazon -- have the lowest reported levels of vascular ageing for any population, with coronary atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) being...Show More Summary

Tsimané of the Bolivian Amazon have world's healthiest hearts, says study

Heart attacks and strokes are almost unknown amongst the Tsimané thanks to a high carbohydrate, low protein diet and active lifestyle, say researchers A high carbohydrate diet of rice, plantain, manioc and corn, with a small amount of...Show More Summary

Casa Sanchez combines urban living with the lush Bolivian rainforest

Looking like a modest, one-story building when seen from the road, the Sanchez House actually boasts three spacious floors that offer stunning views of the Bolivian Amazon. Young Bolivian architect Juan Carlos Menacho designed the residence,...Show More Summary

Music is universal — but the way it makes us feel may not be

last yearHealth : The Checkup

The Tsimane people of the Bolivian Amazon might find the "Twilight Zone" music theme no more spooky than the one from "Star Wars."

Glad to be home: Hormonal basis of affiliation, competition among hunters in the Bolivian Amazon

Absence, it seems, really does make the heart grow fonder. That's according to new research conducted by anthropologists, who found that levels of the 'love' hormone oxytocin increases among Tsimane men when they come home to their families after a day of hunting.

Odd Ditches Made Before Amazon Rainforest Grew

Some 3,000 years ago, the Bolivian Amazon didn’t look like a jungle at all—it was more like an African savannah. A new study reveals how the ancient landscape took shape, and sheds new light on the mysterious ditches the early Amazonians built there for purposes unknown. The key...

Hidden shell middens reveal ancient human presence in Bolivian Amazon

Previously unknown archeological sites in forest islands reveal human presence in the western Amazon as early as 10,000 years ago, according to new research.

Hidden shell middens reveal ancient human presence in Bolivian Amazon

Previously unknown archeological sites in forest islands reveal human presence in the western Amazon as early as 10,000 years ago, according to research published August 28 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Umberto Lombardo from the University of Bern, Switzerland and colleagues from other institutions. read more

Eating Bolivian Piranha: An Indiana Jones Moment

by John Merwin So how about a nice, tasty piranha for lunch? I caught the fish in the photo, a yellow piranha about a foot long, some years back while fishing the Bolivian headwaters of the Amazon. And it was indeed delicious, sort of like eating a giant bluegill. The circumstances were even stranger than the fish. Show More Summary

Bolivian president vetoes Amazon road

6 years agoLifestyle / Travel : Gadling

Bolivian President Evo Morales signed a law on Tuesday that forbids the construction of a new road through the Amazon Rainforest. The road was seen as a threat to the ecosystem of one of Bolivia's more popular national parks and a tribe...Show More Summary

"Heart of Dark Chocolate"

This incredibly rare and expensive chocolate was produced by the venerable firm of Felchlin, which claimed that it was unique in the world, made from an ancient strain of cacao native to the Bolivian Amazon—i.e., wild cacao, au naturel, unmolested by millennia of botanical tinkering. Show More Summary

Today’s Video: Road to nowhere

Bolivian president Evo Morales ordered the suspension of a controversial highway project that would have run through the Amazon rainforest. Morales claimed that the road, which would have linked Brazil to Pacific ports in Chile and Peru, would be vital for Bolivia's economic development. Show More Summary

Indigenous Bolivians face Amazonian road battle

6 years agoNews : Storyful

Hundreds of indigenous people in Bolivia have protested against a road that would run right through a protected area of the Amazon. Those opposed to the road say it shows that President Evo Morales has a double standard on the environment and native rights. Show More Summary

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