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Trend Results : Bronze Age


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Jarlshof in Shetland Islands, Scotland

Located on the edge of green Scottish cliffs, the extensive archeological site known as Jarlshof holds artifacts and structures dating from the Bronze Age right up to the 1700's covering thousands of years worth of human history. The...Show More Summary

Archaeologists compare Neolithic Kent site to Stonehenge, find Bronze Age funerary monument

A Neolithic ditch which became a huge funerary monument when it was enlarged with an outer ring during the Bronze Age has been found on housing development grounds in Kent Archaeologists suspect a “sacred way” could have led to a henge 6,000 years ago at Iwade Meadows, to the west of the Kent industrial town of Sittingbourne. Show More Summary

Remains of at least two bodies found in ancient grave

rchaeologist Paul Murtagh excavating the Bronze Age burial cist in which the remains of at least two bodies were found Archaeologists have discovered the remains of at least two bodies in a Bronze Age burial cist in a remote area of the west Highlands. Show More Summary

Take a look at a 5,000-year-old game, possibly the oldest known to humans

5 days agoNews : The Newsroom

Discovered in a "a 820- by 492-foot [burial] mound near Siirt in southeast Turkey," the pieces date back to the Bronze Age. "Some depict pigs, dogs and pyramids," Haluk Sa?lamtimur of Ege University in ?zmir, Turkey, told Discovery News.

Go Ahead, Blame the Jews for All the Troubles in the World

Their invention of monotheism has proven to be the curse that keeps on giving No, don't blame contemporary Israelis. Blame Bronze Age Semitic Canaanites circa 800 B.C.. When Yahweh whipped Baal in the battle of the barbecued bulls (1 Kings 18) the one-and-only jealous God began his ascendance. Show More Summary

Together beyond the grave

Yet another one: Russian archaeologists unearth ‘Romeo and Juliet of the Bronze Age’ It’s another case of a couple of skeletons apparently positioned in some sort of embrace. This is probably the fourth of fifth one of these I’ve linked to over the years, so I’m starting to think it was more common than one might [...]

Dating the second timber circle at Norwich

In the late 1990s two remarkable Bronze Age timber circles were discovered on Holme Beach. One of these – Seahenge – was excavated in 1998 and 1999. Since the excavations the second circle has been monitored and evidence of damage by coastal processes has been recorded. Show More Summary

Not Atlanta

Wooden Chariots Unearthed At 4000-Year-Old Burial Site In Georgia Archaeologists in the country of Georgia have discovered an ancient burial site that dates all the way back to the Early Bronze Age. Entombed within the chamber, which researchers say was intended for a chief, were seven bodies, a variety of ceremonial artifacts, and two well-preserved chariots, [...]

Wooden Chariots Unearthed At 4000-Year-Old Burial Site In Georgia

2 months agoGenres / Sci Fi : io9

Archaeologists in the country of Georgia have discovered an ancient burial site that dates all the way back to the Early Bronze Age. Entombed within the chamber, which researchers say was intended for a chief, were seven bodies, a variety of ceremonial artifacts, and two well-preserved chariots, each with four wooden wheels. Read more...

The logboats in the lake

A diver from the National Monuments Service’s Underwater Archaeology Unit records a 12m-long Bronze Age logboat at the bottom of Lough Corrib. For up to 4,500 years, a series of sunken dug-out canoes have been lying, forgotten, on the bottom of Lough Corrib in Co. Show More Summary

Ancient Burial Site Reveals 4K-Year-Old Chariots

A dig at a 4,000-year-old burial site in the country of Georgia has turned up a pair of wooden chariots along with human remains, possibly from sacrifices, LiveScience reports. The 39-foot-high Early Bronze Age mound is known as a kurgan and would have been the resting place of a...

Neolithic Shell Derived Beads Were Locally Made

A new study by scientists at the University of York has shed new light on the use of mollusc shells as personal adornments by Bronze Age people.The research team used amino acid racemisation analysis (a technique used previously mainly...Show More Summary

Archaeo-astronomy steps out from shadows of the past

From the ‘Crystal Pathway’ that links stone circles on Cornwall’s Bodmin Moor to star-aligned megaliths in central Portugal, archaeo-astronomers are finding evidence that Neolithic and Bronze Age people were acute observers of the Sun, as well as the Moon and stars, and that they embedded astronomical references within their local landscapes.

What amino acids in shells can tell us about Bronze Age people

A new study has shed new light on the use of mollusc shells as personal adornments by Bronze Age people. The research team used amino acid racemisation analysis (a technique used previously mainly for dating artefacts), light microscopy,...Show More Summary

What amino acids in shells can tell us about Bronze Age people

A new study by scientists at the University of York has shed new light on the use of mollusc shells as personal adornments by Bronze Age people. The research team used amino acid racemisation analysis (a technique used previously mainly...Show More Summary

Ancient DNA from Bronze Age Altai

I don't have a copy of this paper, so if you do, feel free to share it with me.Forensic Science International: Genetics Received 2 January 2014; received in revised form 21 May 2014; accepted 25 May 2014. published online 04 June 2014. Show More Summary

Copper Smelting Technologies From 1500 to 1600 BC in the South Caucasus

Late Bronze and Early Iron Age copper smelting technologies in the South Caucasus: the view from ancient Colchis c. 1500–600 BCAuthors:Erb-Satullo et alAbstract:Many of the arguments for how and why people began to use iron in Southwest Asia rely on assumptions about the technology and relative organization of copper and iron smelting. Show More Summary

Talk about creepy. . . .

The 4,000-year-old whopper: Russian fisherman accidentally catches a rare Bronze Age figurine of a pagan god A Russian fisherman who expected nothing more than a haul of tench and carp ended up catching a 4,000-year-old pagan god statue from the bottom of a riverbed. Local archaeologists have hailed Siberian Nikolay Tarasov’s finding as ‘unique and amazing’ as [...]

Earliest houses, Bronze Age cremations and tools found by archaeologists in Scotland

An early Bronze Age food vessel found at East Challoch Farm in the south of Scotland © Guard Archaeology A Neolithic home which is south-west Scotland’s earliest known house, two cemeteries carrying 20 Bronze Age cremations, a pair of...Show More Summary

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