Trend Results : Cassini


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Cassini captures its own grave in new NASA image release

NASA has released a somber view of Saturn's night side, created from some of the final images captured by the Cassini spacecraft. An annotated version of the release poignantly highlights the region of Saturn's cloud surface in which...Show More Summary

There’s something wrong with NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

NASA has had an incredible streak of good luck as of late with spacecraft that have far outlived their expectations. Cassini at Saturn, the Opportunity rover on Mars, and several other pieces of high-tech space hardware have performed for much longer than was initially expected of them. Show More Summary

Obscure ’90s Serial Killer Movie ‘Star Time’ Getting Vinegar Syndrome Blu-ray

Nobody but Vinegar Syndrome would ever release this movie. God bless. Vinegar Syndrome just announced their releases for this coming March, and the 1992 horror film Star Time is on the list. Written and directed by Alexander Cassini, the obscure serial killer slasher is coming to Blu-ray and DVD with limited edition slipcover – the […]

Lost NASA satellite wakes up after being declared ‘dead’ 13 years ago

NASA has had a pretty great string of luck when it comes to spacecraft reliability as of late. The Cassini probe around Saturn proved to be so reliable that its mission was extended multiple times, and the Juno probe hanging out around Jupiter is already being considered for a mission extension thanks to its steady performance. Show More Summary

Life Beneath Enceladus’ Ice?

The Cassini probe reveals a chemical brew erupting from the Saturnian moon.

Space out with planets in Google Maps

Twenty years ago, the spacecraft Cassini launched from Cape Canaveral on a journey to uncover the secrets of Saturn and its many moons. During its mission, Cassini recorded and sent nearly half a million pictures back to Earth, allowing scientists to reconstruct these distant worlds in unprecedented detail. Show More Summary

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft shows us how Earth-like Saturn’s moon is

Even though NASA’s Cassini spacecraft took it’s final plunge into Saturn’s surface in September of 2017, scientists are still sifting through a bunch of data it sent back. Josh King has the story (@abrigdetoland).        

Stunning New NASA Cassini Image Reveals Moon of Saturn to be Shockingly Earth-Like

4 weeks agoNews : Newsweek: US

The moon's unique atmosphere is part of the reason the Cassini mission had to come to such a bitter end.

ALL THESE MOONS ARE YOURS: NASA’s Cassini spacecraft found a remarkable similarity between Earth a…

ALL THESE MOONS ARE YOURS: NASA’s Cassini spacecraft found a remarkable similarity between Earth and Saturn’s moon Titan.

New Cassini map of Titan reveals an Earth-like sea level

last monthTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

An international team of scientists has discovered that the Saturnian moon Titan has its own sea level dictating the height of its alien hydrocarbon oceans. The new discovery adds to a growing list of geological characteristics and processes...Show More Summary

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft found a remarkable similarity between Earth and Saturn’s moon Titan

NASA's Cassini spacecraft went on a long and treacherous mission that ended last year in spectacular fashion. The large space explorer dove into Saturn's atmosphere, exploded into flames, and then disintegrated into nothing. It might seem like a harrowing end, but this was actually NASA's plan all along. Show More Summary

"Eerily Similar" --Sea Level on Saturn's Titan, a Billion Miles from Earth

Saturn's moon Titan may be nearly a billion miles away from Earth, but a recently published paper based on data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft reveals a new way this distant world and our own are eerily similar. Just as the...      ...

Titan topographic map unearths cookie-cutter holes in moon's surface

(Cornell University) Using the now-complete Cassini data set, Cornell University astronomers have created a new global topographic map of Saturn's moon Titan that has opened new windows into understanding its liquid flows and terrain. Two papers, recently published in Geophysical Review Letters, describe the map and discoveries arising from it.

Space in 2018: Big rockets, asteroid hunting and a close shave with the Sun

last monthTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

The year just gone was a momentous one for furthering our understanding of the universe. SpaceX now routinely lands its rockets, NASA's Cassini craft crashed into Saturn in a spectacular and invaluable mission finale and researchers proved once and for all the existence of gravitational waves. Show More Summary

What We’re Sending to Space in 2018

2017 was something of a banner year for aeronautics and space exploration. Cassini’s phenomenal death dive into the upper reaches of Saturn, the consistency of SpaceX launches using recovered rockets, and, of course, […] The post What We’re Sending to Space in 2018 appeared first on Geek.com.

Image: Veil of ice in Saturn's rings

Saturn's rings, made of countless icy particles, form a translucent veil in this view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Saturn's moon Titan sports Earth-like features

Using the now-complete Cassini data set, Cornell astronomers have created a new global topographic map of Saturn's moon Titan that has opened new windows into understanding its liquid flows and terrain. Two new papers, published Dec. 2 in Geophysical Review Letters, describe the map and discoveries arising from it.

Cassini Is Dead; Long Live Cassini

The Saturn probe completes its years-long mission in a fiery descent.

6 of the most remarkable space moments of 2017

2 months agoLifestyle / Fashion : AOL: Style

From the astonishing solar eclipse that captivated millions across America to the end of the 20-year long Cassini spacecraft mission, 2017 was an astounding year for space discoveries. Read morelogs | Comments

Year in Search: To infinity and beyond

2 months agoTechnology / Google : Google Blog

The solar system had its shining moment this year, according to our annual Year in Search. From questions about the solar eclipse to the end of the Cassini spacecraft’s exploration of Saturn, the galaxy turned to Google Search for answers to out-of-this-world questions. Show More Summary

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