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Trend Results : Charles Darwin


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A Floating Library on the Hudson

5 days agoArts : Hyperallergic

It isn't often you're given the luxury of unwinding in a library aboard an old vessel, unless you're Charles Darwin or Steve Zissou. For one month, however, the historic Lilac Museum Steamship—the last steam-propelled lighthouse tender in the country—docks by the Hudson River, open to the public as a floating library, free of charge.

How good is the fossil record? New study casts doubt on their usefulness

Do all the millions of fossils in museums around the world give a balanced view of the history of life, or is the record too incomplete to be sure? This question was first recognized by Charles Darwin and has worried scientists ever since.

Making a Comparison Between Charles Darwin and World War I

What started World War I? An anarchist in Serbia shot and killed a visiting Austrian leader. But why would that shooting trigger the killing of millions, including one out of two young Frenchmen, in what we now know as World War I, which began a hundred years ago?

Danish museum discovers unique gift from Charles Darwin

The Natural History Museum of Denmark recently discovered a unique gift from one of the greatest-ever scientists. In 1854, Charles Darwin – father of the theory of evolution – sent a gift to his Danish colleague Japetus Steenstrup, director of the Royal Museum of Natural History. Show More Summary

Gift from Charles Darwin found in Danish museum

The University of Copenhagen’s Natural History Museum has found a unique treasure in its stores: 55 barnacle specimens personally assembled and labeled by Charles Darwin. It all began, as so few things do but many should, with a 160-million-year-old Diplodocus skeleton. Misty is the skeleton of a Diplodocus longus discovered by the teenage sons of [...]

Charles Darwin and his family's terrible medical condition

Charles Robert Darwin (1809–1882) was born to a wealthy doctor and financier Robert Darwin and his wife Susannah Wedgwood Darwin; plus he was a grandson of the brilliant physician and scientist, Erasmus Darwin. But all the family's medical scholarship and financial resources couldn't save young Charles from a life of pain. Show More Summary

Hume, Smith, and the Myth of Mirror Neurons

For both David Hume and Adam Smith, sympathy or "fellow-feeling with any passion whatever" is the psychological ground of our moral experience. From his reading of Hume and Smith, Charles Darwin adopted this idea of sympathy in explaining...Show More Summary

Human Expressions

Photographs from the 1862 book Mécanisme de la Physionomie Humaine by Guillaume Duchenne. Through electric stimulation, determined which muscles were responsible for different facial expressions. Charles Darwin would later republish some of these photographs in his own work on the subject, which compared facial expressions in humans to those in animals. See more »

Not for plucking

2 months agoTechnology : Babbage

AROUND 150m years ago, in the late Jurassic period, one of the earliest-known birds lived among the tropical islands in an area of the world that is now Europe. The fossilised remains of Archaeopteryx so struck Charles Darwin that he...Show More Summary

The Library That Kept Darwin Company for Five Years, Reconstructed

2 months agoArts : Hyperallergic

For the five years Charles Darwin spent sailing on the HMS Beagle the budding naturalist had around 404 books for company. After the ship returned to England on October 2, 1836, the books were dispersed, only now reassembled in a digital form.

Barnacle Superglue Finally Comes Unglued

Barnacles have been attaching themselves to ships for as long as humans have been sailing and the strength of their natural glue is both frustrating and amazing. Charles Darwin figured out where it came from (cement glands in barnacle larvae) but how this superglue works so well...

After 150 Years, Scientists Finally Know How Barnacle Glue Works

Over a century and a half ago, Charles Darwin first described the remarkable adhesive capabilities of barnacles. He couldn’t figure out how their natural superglue worked though. And it took until now to finally unlock the barnacle glue’s mysteries. More »      

After 150 Years, Scientists Finally Know How Barnacle Glue Works

2 months agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmodo

Over a century and a half ago, Charles Darwin first described the remarkable adhesive capabilities of barnacles. He couldn't figure out how their natural superglue worked, though. And it took until now to finally unlock the barnacle glue's mysteries. Read more...

Darwin's Entire Library Aboard The HMS Beagle Is Now Available Online

This from the usually forward looking site io9, "A historian has reconstructed the lost library of books that accompanied Charles Darwin during his five-year scientific voyage across the world, allowing the public to read the more than...Show More Summary

Darwin's Entire Library Aboard The HMS Beagle Is Now Available Online

2 months agoGenres / Sci Fi : io9

A historian has reconstructed the lost library of books that accompanied Charles Darwin during his five-year scientific voyage across the world, allowing the public to read the more than 400 volumes that served as reference and inspiration for the young naturalist whose theories would revolutionize biology. Read more...

SciShow Explains Why Humans Blush But Animals Don’t

2 months agoOdd : Laughing Squid

Michael Aranda explains why human beings blush, while animals don’t, in the latest Quick Questions by SciShow. Charles Darwin referred to the trait as, “the most peculiar and most human of all expressions.” Your face turns red because your sympathetic nervous system kicks in. That’s the network of nerves that controls your fight-or-flight response. When [...]

Domestication syndrome: White patches, baby faces and tameness explained by mild neural crest deficits

More than 140 years ago, Charles Darwin noticed something peculiar about domesticated mammals. Compared to their wild ancestors, domestic species are more tame, and they also tend to display a suite of other characteristic features, including floppier ears, patches of white fur, and more juvenile faces with smaller jaws. Show More Summary

FIFA Whiffs at Conservation Effort of Endangered World Cup Mascot

Charles Darwin ate one on his trip to Brazil. Apparently it tasted more like pork than chicken. My nine-year-old, football-mad, half-Brazilian son could identify one on his World Cup merchandising and my Brazilian biologist wife knew it was some kind of armadillo, but not which species. Show More Summary

How Evolution Gave Some Fish Their Shocking Electric Powers

The electric eel is one of the many creatures Charles Darwin sliced up and examined in his years aboard the H.M.S. Beagle. When he cut it open, he found that 80 percent of the fish’s body was taken up by three organs made of what looked like muscle tissue, but not quite. This is where […]

History of "Color Dictionaries"

3 months agoOdd : Boing Boing

In 1831, Charles Darwin carried a book called the Nomenclature of Colours aboard the HMS Beagle. Scientists used this book and other "color dictionaries," predecessors to today's Pantone swatch books, as a common reference when describing the appearance of whatever they were studying. Read the rest

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