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Two new breast cancer genes emerge from lynch syndrome gene study

NEW YORK, NY (January 18, 2018)--Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian have identified two new breast cancer genes. Having one of the genes--MSH6 and PMS2--approximately doubles a woman's risk...Show More Summary

Novel precision medicine trial for metastatic pancreatic cancer

(Columbia University Medical Center) The Lustgarten Foundation has awarded Columbia University's Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) a three-year grant, as part of its Translational Clinical Program, to test a new precision medicine approach to the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer.

Pancreatic cancer accelerated by stress, finds study

(Columbia University Medical Center) A new study shows how stress accelerates pancreatic cancer development. Beta-blockers, which block stress hormones, may increase survival for patients with the disease.

Gene fusion shifts cell activity into high gear, causing some cancer

(Columbia University Medical Center) Researchers at Columbia University discovered that a common fusion of two adjacent genes can cause cancer by kicking mitochondria into overdrive, increasing the amount of fuel available for rampant cell growth.

The Structure Of Scientific Devolutions: An Open Letter From Concerned Scholars

Co-authored by Sarp Aksel MD Montefiore Medical Center, Lauren Broussard MSW, MPH DrPH(c) Columbia University, Meghan Eagen

Electron microscope images reveal how cells absorb a vital mineral

(Columbia University Medical Center) Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have obtained the first detailed snapshots of the structure of a membrane pore that enables epithelial cells to absorb calcium. The findings could...Show More Summary

Electron microscope images reveal how cells absorb a vital mineral

Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have obtained the first detailed snapshots of the structure of a membrane pore that enables epithelial cells to absorb calcium. The findings could accelerate the development of drugs to correct abnormalities in calcium uptake, which have been linked to cancers of the breast, endometrium, prostate, and colon.

Amber-Tinted Glasses May Provide Relief for Insomnia

Knowing that individuals with insomnia are also unlikely to change their ways, researchers from Columbia University Medical Center tested a method to reduce the adverse effects of evening ambient light exposure, while still allowing use of blue light-emitting devices. Their findings will be published in the January issue of Journal of Psychiatric Research.

Amber-tinted glasses may provide relief for insomnia

(Columbia University Medical Center) Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center tested a method to reduce the adverse effects of evening ambient light exposure, while still allowing use of blue light-emitting devices.

Cancer immunotherapy may work better in patients with specific genes

(Columbia University Medical Center) Investigators have been trying to understand why and have recently found how an individual's own genes can play a role in the response to the immunotherapy drugs.

Suicidal thoughts rapidly reduced with ketamine, finds study

(Columbia University Medical Center) Ketamine was significantly more effective than a commonly used sedative in reducing suicidal thoughts in depressed patients, according to researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). They also found that ketamine's anti-suicidal effects occurred within hours after its administration.

Kidney disease diagnosis may benefit from DNA sequencing

New York, NY (Dec. 4, 2017)--DNA sequencing could soon become part of the routine diagnostic workup for patients with chronic kidney disease, suggests a new study from Columbia University Medical Center. The researchers found that DNA...Show More Summary

Largest study of opioid deaths reveals who is at most risk

(Columbia University Medical Center) A new study of 13,000 people who died of an opioid overdose found that more than half had been diagnosed with chronic pain; many had psychiatric disorders.

World's smallest tape recorder is built from microbes

(Columbia University Medical Center) Through a few clever molecular hacks, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have converted a natural bacterial immune system into a microscopic data recorder, laying the groundwork for a new class of technologies that use bacterial cells for everything from disease diagnosis to environmental monitoring.

World's smallest tape recorder is built from microbes

Through a few clever molecular hacks, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have converted a natural bacterial immune system into a microscopic data recorder, laying the groundwork for a new class of technologies that use bacterial cells for everything from disease diagnosis to environmental monitoring.

Schizophrenia drug development may be 'de-risked' with new research tool

(Columbia University Medical Center) Researchers have identified biomarkers that can help with development of better treatments for schizophrenia.

Global birth season study links environment with disease risk

(Columbia University Medical Center) A new study sheds light on connections between birth month and risk for certain diseases.

Smell test challenge suggests clinical benefit for some before development of Alzheimer's

(Columbia University Medical Center) In a new study, researchers have determined that a declining sense of smell may be able to identify patients with mild cognitive impairment that could respond to certain drugs used to treat Alzheimer's disease.

Diabetes researchers discover potential new insulin sensitizers

(Columbia University Medical Center) Researchers may have found a way to treat insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes, while avoiding side effects such as weight gain.

Neighborhoods can affect the need for urgent asthma care

(American College of Chest Physicians) In a new study presented at CHEST 2017, researchers from Columbia University Medical Center in New York aimed to determine if the associations between combustion-related air pollutant levels and urgent asthma care differed by neighborhood in New York City. Show More Summary

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