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Could a skin patch melt away unwanted fat?

4 days agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

Someday in the not-too-distant future, getting rid of those unwanted "love handles" may be as easy as applying skin patches to your lower abdomen. In experiments on obese mice, researchers from Columbia University Medical Center andShow More Summary

Skin patch dissolves 'love handles' in mice

(Columbia University Medical Center) Researchers have developed a medicated skin patch that can turn energy-storing white fat into energy-burning brown fat locally while raising the body's metabolism. The patch could be used to burn off pockets of unwanted fat and treat metabolic disorders like obesity and diabetes.

NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center's Tele-Ophthalmology Unit Pioneers Anti-Blindness Effort

NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) recently unveiled a state-of-the-art mobile testing unit in a push to reduce blindness-causing eye diseases across the city.

Suicide attempts on the rise in US, finds study

(Columbia University Medical Center) New data confirm that suicide attempts among US adults are on the rise, with a disproportional effect on younger, socioeconomically disadvantaged adults with a history of mental disorders.

Marijuana may produce psychotic-like effects in high-risk individuals

(Columbia University Medical Center) Marijuana may bring on temporary paranoia and other psychosis-related effects in individuals at high risk of developing a psychotic disorder, finds a preliminary study from researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC).

Predicting atypical development in infants at high risk for autism?

(Columbia University Medical Center) New research from the Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) identifies a potential biomarker that predicts atypical development in 1- to 2-month-old infants at high versus low familial risk for developing autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

Cancer Immunotherapy May Get a Boost by Disabling Specific T Cells

Cancer immunotherapy drugs only work for a minority of patients, but a generic drug now used to increase blood flow may be able to improve those odds, a study by Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers suggests.

Cancer immunotherapy may get a boost by disabling specific T cells

(Columbia University Medical Center) Cancer immunotherapy drugs only work for a minority of patients, but a generic drug now used to increase blood flow may be able to improve those odds, a study by Columbia University Medical Center researchers suggests.

Malaria: Drug candidate may reduce spread of the parasite

(Columbia University Medical Center) Scientists have identified a class of compounds that can block transmission of the parasite that causes malaria and reduce resistance to currently available drugs.

Dr. Pawel Muranski to Head New Cellular Immunotherapy Laboratory at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center

Dr. Pawel Muranski has joined NewYork-Presbyterian and Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) as director of cellular immunotherapy at the newly established Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) cell production lab and assistant director of Transfusion Medicine and Cellular Therapy.

Bone-derived hormone reverses age-related memory loss in mice

(Columbia University Medical Center) Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center reversed age-related memory loss in mice by boosting blood levels of osteocalcin, a hormone produced by bone cells.

ARCADIA Trial Will Test Link Between Stroke and a Common Heart Condition

A new clinical trial led by investigators at NewYork-Presbyterian, Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and Weill Cornell Medicine aims to identify and treat what may be a common underlying cause of recurrent strokes.

How the tongue keeps its tastes straight

(Columbia University Medical Center) New research at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) has revealed how special molecules help the tongue communicate with the brain to identify the correct taste. Using this knowledge, scientists were able rewire the taste-system of mice to perceive sweet stimuli as bitter tastes, and vice versa. Show More Summary

Dr. Laureen Hill Named Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center

NewYork-Presbyterian has named Dr. Laureen Hill senior vice president and chief operating officer of NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center, effective the end of October.

Study Allays Concerns Over Aspirin's Safety for Heart Failure Patients

A study by researchers at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center and published in JACC: Heart Failure, a journal of the American College of Cardiology Foundation, allays concerns among cardiologists that aspirin could...Show More Summary

Dr. Virendra Patel Leads Vascular Surgery at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Dr. Virendra Patel has been named chief of the Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Interventions and co-director of the Aortic Program at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center, and an associate professor of surgery at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), effective July 1.

Scientists capture first image of major brain receptor in action

(Columbia University Medical Center) Columbia University Medical Center researchers have captured the first three-dimensional snapshots of the AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor in action. The receptor, which regulates most electrical signaling in the brain, is involved in several important brain activities, including memory and learning.

Select Memories Can Be Erased, Leaving Others Intact

Different types of memories stored in the same neuron of the marine snail Aplysia can be selectively erased, according to a new study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and McGill University and published today in Current Biology.

Recreational cannabis, used often, increases risk of gum disease

(Columbia University Medical Center) Recreational use of cannabis -- including marijuana, hashish, and hash oil -- increases the risk of gum disease, says a study by Columbia University dental researchers.

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