Trend Results : Coral Reef


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Sentinel-2 captures coral bleaching of Great Barrier Reef

Scientists observed the bleaching of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef early this year using satellite images. While capturing these events from space has been difficult in the past, Sentinel-2’s frequent revisits and its resolution makes it possible.

Recent developments surrounding the South China Sea

10 hours agoNews : The Cutline

BEIJING (AP) — A look at recent developments in the South China Sea, where China is pitted against smaller neighbors in multiple disputes over islands, coral reefs and lagoons in waters crucial for global commerce and rich in fish and potential oil and gas reserves:

Is the Great Barrier Reef dead?

23 hours agoHumor / odd : Kottke.org

Due to the unprecedented bleaching events over the past few years, the Great Barrier Reef has been eulogized extensively in the media. But it’s not actually dead. Yet. In this video for Vox, Joss Fong explains how corals form, bleach,...Show More Summary

Flickr study gives snapshot of coral reefs' value

Computer-led analysis of tourist snaps has estimated that coral reefs contribute $36 billion per year to the global tourist economy.

The combined effects of increased temperature and ocean acidification on the early life history stages of Caribbean coral and its implication for the recovery potential of Florida reefs

The early life history stages of coral are an essential component determining the recovery potential of coral reefs through sexual reproduction and recruitment. The pelagic larval phase is inherent in all coral species regardless of differing reproductive strategies and is the only time in coral life history where large scale movement is possible allowing for […]

Rethinking role of viruses in coral reef ecosystems

(San Diego State University) Viruses are thought to frequently kill their host bacteria, especially at high microbial density. A state called lysogeny, in which viruses lie dormant but don't kill their hosts, has been thought to be relatively rare, mostly occurring at low bacterial concentrations. Show More Summary

Rethinking role of viruses in coral reef ecosystems

Conventional wisdom has it that within virus-bacteria population dynamics, viruses frequently kill their host bacterial cells—a process called lysis—especially when there's a large concentration of bacteria. A different dynamic called...Show More Summary

The hunt for a super coral: can cold-water corals adapt to ocean acidification?

When most people think of a coral reef they are imagining a sunny tropical beach, but many coral species are actually found in the dark, cold waters of the deep sea. These corals, commonly known as cold-water corals due to their preference for low temperatures, form beautiful ecosystems that are teeming with life. One of […]

Google's 'superpower' for teachers: AR and VR - CNET

So far, Google's AR program has taken 2 million kids to the coral reefs and space.

Common reef-building coral in the Northern Red Sea resistant to elevated temperature and acidification

Coral reefs are currently experiencing substantial ecological impoverishment as a result of anthropogenic stressors, and the majority of reefs are facing immediate risk. Increasing ocean surface temperatures induce frequent coral mass bleaching events—the breakdown of the nutritional photo-symbiosis with intracellular algae (genus: Symbiodinium). Show More Summary

The Red Sea's coral reef may hold the key to fighting global warming

The Red Sea's coral reef may be able to beat climate change. Swiss and Israeli scientists have discovered that as temperatures rise, this special type of coral grows stronger. Read moremments

New coral reef fish species shows rare parental care behavior

The vast majority of coral reef fish produce large numbers of young that disperse into the ocean as larvae, drifting with the currents before settling down on a reef. Giacomo Bernardi, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biologyShow More Summary

New coral reef fish species shows rare parental care behavior

(University of California - Santa Cruz) The vast majority of coral reef fish produce large numbers of young that disperse into the ocean as larvae, drifting with the currents before settling down on a reef. A few reef fish, however keep their broods on the reef, protecting the young until they are big enough to fend for themselves. Show More Summary

Climate change refuge for corals discovered (and how we can protect it right now)

WCS scientists have discovered a refuge for corals where the environment protects otherwise sensitive species to the increasing severity of climate change. The bad news is that the reefs are showing signs of being overfished and weak compliance with local fisheries laws needs to be reversed to maintain the fish that help to keep reefs healthy. Show More Summary

Regular coral larvae supply from neighboring reefs helps degraded reefs recover

(University of Queensland) For reefs facing huge challenges, more coral larvae doesn't necessarily translate to increased rates of coral recovery on degraded reefs, a new Queensland study has showed. The study, published today, was led by former University of Queensland School of Biological Sciences researcher Dr. Show More Summary

Corals that grow faster in warm water could beat climate change

The unique history of the Red Sea means that reefs in its northern part may be able to adapt to higher water temperatures, at least for a while

Travel distances of juvenile fish key to better conservation

Marine reserves—sections of the ocean where fishing is prohibited—promote coral reef sustainability by preventing overfishing and increasing fish abundance and diversity. But to be effective, they need to be sized right, and in a way that accounts for how far juvenile fish travel away from their parents after spawning.

Travel distances of juvenile fish key to better conservation

(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) Marine reserves -- sections of the ocean where fishing is prohibited -- promote coral reef sustainability by preventing overfishing and increasing fish abundance and diversity. But to be effective, they need to be sized right, and in a way that accounts for how far juvenile fish travel away from their parents after spawning.

Climate change and tropical sponges: The effect of elevated pCO? and temperature on the sponge holobiont

As atmospheric CO? concentrations rise, associated ocean warming (OW) and ocean acidification (OA) are predicted to cause declines in reef-building corals globally, shifting reefs from coral-dominated systems to those dominated by less sensitive species. Show More Summary

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