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"Beyond Fermi" -- Crab Nebula's Neutron Star May Solve the Mystery of Cosmic Rays

The Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed by Chinese and other astronomers in the year 1054, and one of the best-studied objects in the history of astronomy, may solve the mystery of cosmic rays. The...        

Stellar corpse sheds light on origin of cosmic rays

(University of Arizona) New research revealed that the entire zoo of electromagnetic radiation streaming from the Crab nebula -- one of the most iconic objects in the sky -- has its origin in one population of electrons and must be produced in a different way than scientists have traditionally thought. Show More Summary

New observations of Crab Nebula and pulsar reveal polarised emissions

New observations of polarised X-rays from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar, published today in Scientific Reports, may help explain sudden flares in the Crab's X-ray intensity, as well as provide new data for modeling – and understanding – the nebula.

Space Photos of the Week: Cranky Old Crab Nebula Still Knows How to Twist and Shout

5 months agoArts / Photography : Wired: Photo

Racing galaxies, Martian craters, and the latest from Cassini. The post Space Photos of the Week: Cranky Old Crab Nebula Still Knows How to Twist and Shout appeared first on WIRED.

NASA's Observatories Combine to Crack Open Secrets of the Crab Nebula and Its Ancient Pulsar

Astronomers have produced a highly detailed image of the Crab Nebula, by combining data from telescopes spanning nearly the entire breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves seen by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to the...        

Composite view of Crab Nebula

Astronomers combined data from five different telescopes to release an image of Crab Nebula, the result of a bright supernova explosion seen by Chinese and other astronomers in the year 1054.        

Supernova’s ghost seen from Earth and space

5 months agoNews : The Raw Story

Telescopes literally from around the world have banded together to give us a detailed look at the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that has been hanging in our night sky for 1,000 years. Scientists used data from three Earth-orbiting satellites, another that trails the Earth in its...

Scientists crack open the Crab Nebula in gorgeous new photo

5 months agoNews : USAToday: News

Astronomers produced a new image of the Crab Nebula by combining data from five telescopes.        

Crab Nebula's freaky tendrils star in new telescope portrait - CNET

5 months agoTechnology / Internet : Webware

A bevy of observatories get together to deliver a stunning new look at the space oddity known as the Crab Nebula.

The Crab Nebula Is Ready for Its Close-Up

In 1054, Chinese astronomers observed a star that glowed particularly bright for two years and then winked out. We know now that they were looking at a supernova, the terminal explosion of a star, when its core collapses under its own gravity. Show More Summary

Image release: Telescopes team up for dramatic new look at the crab nebula

(National Radio Astronomy Observatory) Multiwavelength image with VLA, Spitzer, Hubble, XMM-Newton, and Chandra observatories shows the 'whole picture' of the famous Crab Nebula supernova remnant, and provides astronomers with new insights into the object's complex physics.

Observatories combine to crack open the Crab Nebula

Astronomers have produced a highly detailed image of the Crab Nebula, by combining data from telescopes spanning nearly the entire breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves seen by the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to the powerful X-ray glow as seen by the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory. Show More Summary

Observatories combine to crack open the Crab Nebula

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Astronomers have produced a highly detailed image of the Crab Nebula, by combining data from telescopes spanning nearly the entire breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Scaled laboratory experiments explain the kink behaviour of the Crab Nebula jet

Senior research scientist Chikang Li wants to experiment with the stars. Intrigued by a curious "kink" phenomenon observed in the Crab Nebula, an interstellar cloud of gas and dust that formed in the wake of a supernova explosion, he has been looking for answers. Show More Summary

Scientists catalog nearly 100 dusty globules in the Crab Nebula

Researchers from Sweden have recently studied the presence of dust in the Crab Nebula to locate and characterize numerous dusty globules of this well-known supernova remnant. As a result, they have cataloged 92 dusty globules and derived their properties. A paper describing the research was published Oct. 26 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

NASA spies spooky dead star glowing at nebula's heart - CNET

12 months agoTechnology / Internet : Webware

Peer into the cosmic horror story of the Crab Nebula and the still-beating remnant of a star at its center.

Eerie Glow of the Crab Nebula's Neutron Star --"China's 'Guest Star' of The Year 1050"

The eerie glow of a dead star reveals a tremendous dynamo at the heart of the Crab Nebula, spinning 30 times a second. The wildly whirling object produces a deadly magnetic field that generates an electrifying 1 trillion volts. This...

A dead star's ghostly glow

The eerie glow of a dead star, which exploded long ago as a supernova, reveals itself in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Crab Nebula. But don't be fooled. The ghoulish-looking object still has a pulse. Buried at its center is the star's tell-tale heart, which beats with rhythmic precision.

A dead star's ghostly glow

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The eerie glow of a dead star, which exploded long ago as a supernova, reveals itself in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Crab Nebula.

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