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Multidecadal fCO2 increase along the United States southeast coastal margin

Coastal margins could be hotspots for acidification due to terrestrial-influenced CO2 sources. Currently there are no long-term (>20 years) records from biologically important coastal environments that could demonstrate sea surface CO2 fugacity (fCO2) and pH trends. Show More Summary

SUNY Downstate's Dr. Brahim Chaqour Receives $2 Million for Research Into Treatment of Vision-threatening Diseases

Brahim Chaqour, PhD, professor of cell biology and ophthalmology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has received two awards to support research into treatment of currently incurable vision-threatening diseases. The new awards, totaling $2,008,973, are from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

SUNY downstate receives $2 million for research into vision-threatening diseases

(SUNY Downstate Medical Center) Brahim Chaqour, PhD, professor of cell biology and ophthalmology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has received two awards to support research into treatment of currently incurable vision-threatening diseases. The new awards, totaling $2,008,973, are from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Twin study finds genetics affects where children look, shaping mental development

(Indiana University) A study published Nov. 9 in the journal current Biology and co-led by Indiana University that tracked the eye movement of twins has found that genetics plays a strong role in how people attend to their environme...

Crested pigeons use feathers to sound the alarm

Many animals will sound an alarm to alert other members of their group of impending danger. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on November 9 have shown that crested pigeons do this in a surprisingly non-vocal way. One of their main flight feathers produces a critical high-pitched sound as the birds fly away. Show More Summary

Evolution Caught in the Act

The hypothesis that life on Earth as it is currently found is the result of biological evolution from a common ancestor over billions of years is supported by such a mountain of evidence that it can be treated as an established scientific fact. Further, it is now a fundamental organizing theory of biology. This, of […]

Biological consequences of climate change on epidemics may be scale-dependent

Conventional thinking holds that current climate warming will increase the prevalence and transmission of disease. However, a recent study led by Prof. ZHANG Zhibin of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Prof. Nils Christian Stenseth of the University of Oslo in Norway show that the impact of climate change on the prevalence of epidemics may be scale dependent.

Roaming male mammoths often fell into death traps

last weekArts : Artdaily

Scientists have solved the mystery of why the overwhelming majority of mammoth fossils are male, according to a report published Thursday in the journal Current Biology. Much like wild elephants today, young male Ice Age mammoths likely...Show More Summary

Why Teenage Male Mammoths Tended to Die in Really Silly Ways

Boys will be boys, mammoths will be mammoths, and boy mammoths will be both, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Current Biology. Scientists from the Stockholm University surveyed the remains of 98 mammoths—bones,...Show More Summary

Anthropologists describe third orangutan species

Scientists have long recognized six living species of great ape aside from humans: Sumatran and Bornean orangutans, eastern and western gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on November 2 have...Show More Summary

Newly discovered orangutan species is 'among the most threatened great apes in the world'

(Cell Press) Scientists have long recognized six living species of great ape aside from humans: Sumatran and Bornean orangutans, eastern and western gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on Nov. Show More Summary

Surprise: Sleepwalkers Are Better at Automatic Walking

3 weeks agoTechnology / Gadgets : Geek.com

Sorry, George A. Romero: Real-life zombies—er, sleepwalkers—actually do move quite fast. A study published in the journal Current Biology confirms that somnambulists exhibited increased automation in their movements. Using full-body motion capture and […] The post Surprise: Sleepwalkers Are Better at Automatic Walking appeared first on Geek.com.

Climate change may slowly starve bamboo lemurs

(Cell Press) Reporting in Current Biology on Oct. 26, researchers provide evidence to suggest that as Earth's climate changes, bamboo lemurs will gradually be forced to eat culm for longer periods. Ultimately, they suggest that, based on an analysis of anatomical, behavioral, paleontological, and climate data, the lemurs could slowly starve.

Paleoclimate Research of Earth's Polar Ocean Suggests --"Current Epoch of Climate Change Unparalleled Over the Last 100 Million Years"

"If we are right, our study challenges decades of paleoclimate research," says Anders Meibom, the head of EPFL's Laboratory for Biological Geochemistry and a professor at the University of Lausanne. "Oceans cover 70% of our planet. They play a key...        

SynBioBeta and the current biorevolution

Startups and individuals on the cusp of biological breakthroughs. San Francisco is largely a collection of peninsulas and inlets, irregular land masses that singularly jut out into cold Pacific waters and isolate themselves by virtue of unavoidable geography. Show More Summary

A natural strain of fungus could clean oil spills and return life to Alberta's oilsands

"The current methods of restoring these sites are not as cost efficient or energy efficient as they could be, and can cause more environmental disruption," said Susan Kaminskyj, a professor in the Department of Biology. "Our biotech innovation should help to solve this type of problem faster and with less additional disturbance."

These shrews have heads that shrink with the season

(Cell Press) If any part of the body would seem ill equipped to shrink, it would probably be the head and skull. And, yet, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Oct. 23 have found that the skulls of red-toothed shrews do shrink in anticipation of winter, by up to 20 percent. As spring approaches, their heads grow again to approach their previous size.

Brain Training Can Improve Our Understanding of Speech in Noisy Places

For many people with hearing challenges, trying to follow a conversation in a crowded restaurant or other noisy venue is a major struggle, even with hearing aids. Now, Mass. Eye and Ear researchers reporting in Current Biology on October 19th have some good news: time spent playing a specially designed, brain-training audiogame could help.

Genome-wide data from a 40,000-year-old man in China reveals complicated genetic history of Asia

The biological makeup of humans in East Asia is shaping up to be a very complex story, with greater diversity and more distant contacts than previously known, according to a new study in Current Biology. It analyzes the genome of a man that died in the Tianyuan Cave near Beijing, China 40,000 years ago. Show More Summary

Study finds new feature of 'baby talk' in any language

(Cell Press) When talking with their young infants, parents instinctively use 'baby talk,' a unique form of speech including exaggerated pitch contours and short, repetitive phrases. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Oct. Show More Summary

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