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Northeastern biophysics study makes exciting advancements for the future of DNA sequencing

A Northeastern research team has developed new technology that optimizes DNA sequencing using nanophysics and electric currents. In a paper published in Nature Nanotechnology, Northeastern Professor of Biological Physics Meni Wanunu,...Show More Summary

Rhesus monkeys found to see faces in inanimate objects too

A team of researchers at the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has found that rhesus monkeys, like humans, recognize face-like traits in inanimate objects. In their study published in the journal Current Biology, the researchers describe experiments they carried out with monkeys looking at photographs and what they learned from them.

The rise of the cephalopods

3 weeks agoEducation / Learning : Infocult

The number of cephalopods in the world's oceans is apparently rising. cephalopods—squids, octopuses, cuttlefish—are booming, and scientists don’t know why. An analysis published today in Current Biology indicates that numerous species across the world’s oceans have increased in numbers since...

Even bacteria have baggage—and understanding that is key to fighting superbugs

New research points to treatment strategies for multi-drug antibiotic resistance using currently available drugs. The study, publishing August 8 in the open access journal PLOS Biology by Phillip Yen and Jason Papin at the University...Show More Summary

Google workers criticize employee's memo on diversity

Several current and former Google employees are publicly criticizing an employee-written memo that suggested the lower numbers of women in the tech industry are due to biological differences. The memo, which tech news site Recode published in full, is titled “Google’s Ideological Echo Chamber.”...

The Armour of Borealopelta markmitchelli

The Armour of Borealopelta markmitchelli With the publishing of the formal description of the nodosaurid Borealopelta markmitchelli in the academic journal "Current Biology" this week, Everything Dinosaur has received a number of emails concerning this amazing fossil discovery. Show More Summary

Despite heavy armor, new dinosaur used camouflage to hide from predators

Researchers reporting in Current Biology on August 3 have named a new genus and species of armored dinosaur. The post Despite heavy armor, new dinosaur used camouflage to hide from predators appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Despite heavy armor, new dinosaur used camouflage to hide from predators

Researchers reporting in Current Biology on August 3 have named a new genus and species of armored dinosaur. The 110-million-year-old Borealopelta markmitchelli discovered in Alberta, Canada, on view at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, belongs to the nodosaur family. Show More Summary

Protein analysis and gene expression indicate differential vulnerability of Iberian fish species under a climate change scenario

Current knowledge on the biological responses of freshwater fish under projected scenarios of climate change remains limited. Here, we examine differences in the protein configuration of two endemic Iberian freshwater fish species, Squalius...Show More Summary

Turns Out Birds Speak in Sentences Like People

2 months agoTechnology / Gadgets : Geek.com

More and more it seems that birds deserve a place among other higher animals for their intellect. A new paper in the journal Current Biology suggests that one species — the Japanese tit […] The post Turns Out Birds Speak in Sentences Like People appeared first on Geek.com.

Scientists warn of ‘biological annihilation,’ say mass extinction event is currently happening on Earth

2 months agoNews : The Cutline

When you hear the term "mass extinction" you probably imagine something like the space rock that smacked Earth and led to the demise of the dinosaurs, but according to a new research paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, we're currently experiencing an extinction event of our very own. Show More Summary

Scientists say we're witnessing the planet's sixth mass extinction — and 'biological annihilation' is the latest sign

When kids learn about extinction in school, they're told about creatures that have disappeared from the planet, and those that are endangered. But rarely are they told that we are currently witnessing a mass extinction event — an incredibly...Show More Summary

Scientists warn of ‘biological annihilation,’ say mass extinction event is currently happening on Earth

When you hear the term "mass extinction" you probably imagine something like the space rock that smacked Earth and led to the demise of the dinosaurs, but according to a new research paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, we're currently experiencing an extinction event of our very own. Show More Summary

Sea spiders move oxygen with pumping guts (not hearts)

To keep blood and oxygen flowing throughout their bodies, most animals depend on a beating heart. But researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 10 have discovered that sea spiders use a strange alternative: they move blood and oxygen throughout most of their bodies by pumping their guts.

In fathering, peace-loving bonobos don't spread the love

Bonobos have a reputation for being the peaceful, free-loving hippies of the primate world. But, researchers reporting in Current Biology on July 10 have discovered that despite friendly relations between the sexes, particular males have a surprisingly strong advantage over others when it comes to fathering offspring. Show More Summary

How plants grow like human brains

Plants and brains are more alike than you might think: Salk scientists discovered that the mathematical rules governing how plants grow are similar to how brain cells sprout connections. The new work, published in Current Biology onShow More Summary

The Solomon Sea: its circulation, chemistry, geochemistry and biology explored during two oceanographic cruises

The semi-enclosed Solomon Sea in the southwestern tropical Pacific is on the pathway of a major oceanic circuit connecting the subtropics to the equator via energetic western boundary currents. Waters transiting through this area replenish...Show More Summary

Protein mingling under blue light

One of the current challenges in biology is to understand rapidly-changing phenomena. Interestingly, only a small fraction of them is due to proteins acting in isolation, the majority of biological events are regulated by proteins acting together in clusters. Show More Summary

Researchers find way to better use current drugs to target cancer

(McMaster University) The drugs helped to understand the biology. The researchers worked backwards, employing a series of drugs used in the clinic to understand a new way that cancer stem cells can be killed.

How do genes get new jobs? Wasp venom offers new insights

(University of Rochester) In a study published in Current Biology on June 22, the lab of Professor John Werren at the University of Rochester describes how four closely related species of parasitic wasps change their venoms rapidly in...Show More Summary

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