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Scientists create first laboratory generation of astrophysical shock waves

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) Feature describes first laboratory generation of an astrophysical shock wave.

Machine learning technique offers insight into plasma behavior

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) A paper by graduate student Matthew Parsons describes the application of machine learning to avoiding plasma disruptions, which will be crucial to ensuring the longevity of future large tokamaks.

PPPL researchers demonstrate first hot plasma edge in a fusion facility

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) Article describes first experimental finding of constant temperature in a fusion plasma.

US-China collaboration makes excellent start in optimizing lithium to control plasma

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) For fusion to generate substantial energy, the ultra-hot plasma that fuels fusion reactions must remain stable and kept from cooling. Researchers have recently shown lithium, a soft, silver-white...Show More Summary

Physicists discover that lithium oxide on tokamak walls can improve plasma performance

Lithium compounds improve plasma performance in fusion devices just as well as pure lithium does, a team of physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has found.

Physicists discover that lithium oxide on tokamak walls can improve plasma performance

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) A team of physicists has discovered that a coating of lithium oxide on the inside of fusion machines known as tokamaks absorbs as much deuterium as pure lithium does.

Scientists perform first-principles simulation of transition of plasma edge to H-mode

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have simulated the spontaneous transition of turbulence at the edge of a fusion plasma to the high-confinement mode (H-mode) that sustains fusion reactions. The detailed simulation is the first basic physics, or first-principles-based, modeling with few simplifying assumptions.

Scientists perform first-principles simulation of transition of plasma edge to H-mode

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) PPPL physicists have simulated the spontaneous transition of turbulence at the edge of a fusion plasma to the high-confinement mode that sustains fusion reactions. The research was achieved with the extreme-scale plasma turbulence code XGC developed at PPPL in collaboration with a nationwide team.

New model of plasma stability could help researchers predict and avoid disruptions

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) PPPL physicists have helped develop a new computer model of plasma stability in doughnut-shaped fusion machines known as tokamaks. The new model incorporates recent findings gathered from related research efforts and simplifies the physics involved so computers can process the program more quickly. Show More Summary

New model of plasma stability could help researchers predict and avoid disruptions

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have helped develop a new computer model of plasma stability in doughnut-shaped fusion machines known as tokamaks. The new model incorporates...Show More Summary

Scientists further understanding of a process that causes heat loss in fusion devices

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) In the past year, scientists at PPPL have made important advances in understanding secondary electron emission.

Simulations of DIII-D experiments shed light on mysterious plasma flows

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) Article describes how heating core of the plasma can create sheared flow that improves stability and performance of fusion devices.

Simulations of DIII-D experiments shed light on mysterious plasma flows

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and General Atomics have simulated a mysterious self-organized flow of the superhot plasma that fuels fusion reactions. The findings show...Show More Summary

Discovery of a source of fast magnetic reconnection

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) Feature describes source of the acceleration of a common type of magnetic reconnection.

New feedback system could allow greater control over fusion plasma

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) A physicist has created a new system that will let scientists control the energy and rotation of plasma in real time in a doughnut-shaped machine known as a tokamak.

Advanced fusion code selected to participate in Early Science Programs on three new DOE pre-exascale supercomputers

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-performance computer sites have selected a dynamic fusion code, led by physicist C.S. Chang of the DOE's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), for optimization on three powerful new supercomputers. Show More Summary

PPPL-led fusion code selected for all three pre-exascale supercomputers.

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) Description of PPPL-led fusion code selected to run on all three pre-exascale supercomputers.

PPPL scientist uncovers physics behind plasma-etching process

(DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory) PPPL physicist Igor Kaganovich and collaborators have uncovered some of the physics that make possible the etching of silicon computer chips, which power cell phones, computers, and a huge range of electronic devices.

Scientist uncovers physics behind plasma-etching process

Physicist Igor Kaganovich at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and collaborators have uncovered some of the physics that make possible the etching of silicon computer chips, which power cell phones, computers, and a huge range of electronic devices. Show More Summary

Physicists uncover clues to mechanism behind magnetic reconnection

Physicist Fatima Ebrahimi at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has published a paper showing that magnetic reconnection—the process in which magnetic field lines snap together and release energy—can be triggered by motion in nearby magnetic fields. Show More Summary

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