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Immigrant Nobel Prize Winner Sir J. Fraser Stoddart And America's Future In Science

8 months agoTechnology : Forbes: Tech

In 2016, all six American winners of the Nobel Prize in economics and scientific fields were immigrants, including chemistry winner Sir J. Fraser Stoddart.

Chemistry Nobel Laureate Fraser Stoddart Made Our Department a Fun Place to Be

Stoddart encouraged free thinking and the flow of ideas. Along with his eye for detail and signature intensity, he struck an easy balance in the workplace. The post Chemistry Nobel Laureate Fraser Stoddart Made Our Department a Fun Place to Be appeared first on The Good Men Project.

Black clouds and silver linings: 2016 chemistry Nobel Laureate Fraser Stoddart's moving tribute to his wife

Sir Fraser Stoddart shared this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry for constructing tiny molecular machines based on the remarkable phenomenon of self-assembly, a process by which forces between atoms automatically pull diverse molecules together into precise geometric configurations without having to explicitly position them this way. Show More Summary

World’s tiniest machines win chemistry Nobel

last yearAcademics : Nature

Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa share 2016 award.

Two Nobel-winning scientists left their mark on Southern California

While the 2016 science Nobel laureates hailed from well outside the Golden State, three local universities celebrated two winners with a California connection: physics laureate Duncan Haldane and chemistry laureate Fraser Stoddart. Haldane, currently of Princeton University, previously taught at...

Sir Fraser Stoddart is awarded Nobel Prize in Chemistry

(Northwestern University) Sir Fraser Stoddart, Board of Trustees Professor of Chemistry in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern University, today (Oct. 5) was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Professor Stoddart as well as Jean-Pierre Sauvage, University of Strasbourg, France, and Bernard L. Show More Summary

Video: Molecular machines: The 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, explained

Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Ph.D., Sir J. Fraser Stoddart, Ph.D., and Bernard L. Feringa, Ph.D., got science's sweetest Swedish phone call earlier today when they won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing synthetic molecular machines. What's a molecular machine?

Nobel Prize Winner Trashes Brexit As Bad For Science

The United Kingdom leaving the European Union would spell bad news for the global science community, according to a winner of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Sir Fraser Stoddart, a Scottish chemist who teaches at Northwestern University,...Show More Summary

3 Inventors of world's tiniest machines to share Nobel Prize in Chemistry

This week, the international team that invented the world’s tiniest machines won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Three scientists will share the prize in an even split: Jean-Pierre Sauvage (France), Sir Fraser Stoddart (Great Britain), and Bernard “Ben” Feringa (Netherlands). Show More Summary

Frenchman Jean-Pierre Sauvage wins Nobel Chemistry Prize

Jean-Pierre Sauvage of France, J. Fraser Stoddart of Britain and Bernard Feringa of the Netherlands were awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the design and production of molecular machines.

Molecular Machines Win 2016 Chemistry Nobel

Three chemists who made some of the first molecular machines have won the 2016 Nobel Prize. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara, FILE) The committee recognized Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa for equal contributions. The molecular machines the three have created include molecular elevators, switches for molecular computers and even molecular [...]

3 Makers of 'Molecular Machine' Share Chemistry Nobel

Frenchman Jean-Pierre Sauvage, British-born Fraser Stoddart, and Dutch scientist Bernard Feringa have won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing molecular machines, the AP reports. The laureates will share the $930,000 prize for the "design and synthesis" of molecules with controllable movements, which can perform a task when energy...

The Nobel Prize in chemistry is awarded to three chemists for 'design and synthesis' of molecular machines

Frenchman Jean-Pierre Sauvage, British-born Fraser Stoddart and Dutch scientist Bernard "Ben" Feringa on Wednesday won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing minuscule machines at the molecular level. The laureates share the $930,000 prize for the "design and synthesis" of molecular machines...

3 laureates split the 2016 Nobel Chemistry Prize for constructing the world’s tiniest machines

Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa split the 2016 Nobel Chemistry Prize for building the world's smallest machines out of chemical molecules. Continue reading ? The post 3 laureates split the 2016 Nobel Chemistry Prize for constructing the world’s tiniest machines appeared first on PBS NewsHour.

The Nobel Prize in chemistry is awarded to three chemists for developing molecular machines

Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa have won this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing molecular machines. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences says molecular machines "will most likely be used in the development of things such as new materials, sensors and energy...

3 Makers of ‘World’s Smallest Machines’ Awarded Nobel Prize in Chemistry

last yearNews : NYTimes: News

Jean-Pierre Sauvage, J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa won for “molecular machines” that can be used for the development of materials, sensors and energy storage systems.

Trio win Nobel Chemistry Prize for tiny molecular machines

Jean-Pierre Sauvage of France, J Fraser Stoddart of Britain and Bernard Feringa of the Netherlands won the Nobel Chemistry Prize on Wednesday for developing molecular machines, the world's smallest machines, the jury said. "They have developed molecules with controllable movements, which can perform a task when energy is added... Show More Summary

Scottish, French and Dutch-born scientists win Nobel chemistry prize

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Jean-Pierre Sauvage, J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa won the 2016 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for work on the design and synthesis of molecular machines, the award-giving body said on Wednesday.

Nobel Prize In Chemistry Shared By 3 Designers Of Molecular Machines

last yearNews : The Two-Way

Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa each made significant progress in the miniaturization of machines — designing a chain, an axle and a rotor blade, respectively.

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