Trend Results : Göbekli Tepe


Blog Post Results (1-20 of 35)

FILTER RESULTS

Is This Where Humanity Decided to Settle Down?

Plant analysis of ancient wild cereals from Göbekli Tepe reveal a remarkable similarity to modern strains

Weekend Link Love – Edition 458

RESEARCH OF THE WEEK More research shows that chocolate is good for cognition. A skull cult at Gobekli Tepe. Why can’t I join a skull cult? Now this is a depression treatment I love: bouldering. Identical workouts have different effects on mood depending on whether you’re indoors or outdoors. Show More Summary

First evidence of a Neolithic ‘skull cult’ at Göbekli Tepe

Three carved skull fragments uncovered at a Neolithic dig site in Turkey feature modifications not seen before among human remains of the time.

Carved skulls provide the first evidence of a neolithic ‘skull cult’ at Göbekli Tepe

In Turkey, Carved Skulls Provide the First Evidence of a Neolithic "Skull Cult": Three carved skull fragments uncovered at a Neolithic dig site in Turkey feature modifications not seen before among human remains of the time, researchers...Show More Summary

Dead heads: Turkish site reveals more evidence of neolithic 'skull cult'

Fragments of three skulls found at Göbekli Tepe have hallmarks of being carved with flint after being scalped and defleshed first A carving found on a pillar at Göbekli Tepe, apparently showing a figurine holding a head. Photograph:Show More Summary

The Remains of an Ancient 'Skull Cult' Have Been Found

At Göbekli Tepe, an ancient site in southern Turkey, archaeologists have been digging and discovering things for years. First excavated by a German archaeologist in 1996, it was built around 12,000 years ago, possibly as some kind of...Show More Summary

An ancient 'skull cult' might've carved up bones to shame their enemies

3 months agoNews : The Cutline

An ancient "skull cult" might've existed thousands of years ago in present-day Turkey. Three deeply carved skulls found at the Göbekli Tepe archaeological site suggest that humans disfigured the bones as part of a ritual, perhaps...Show More Summary

Skull fragments with carved long, deliberate lines found at Gobekli Tepe

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the German Archaeological Institute has found long, deliberate marks carved into ancient skulls found at the Göbekli Tepe dig site. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes the skull fragments they have been studying and offer some possible explanations for the markings they found.

Dawn of the skull cult

3 months agoEducation / Learning : Infocult

Recent excavations and research into Göbekli Tepe reveal what one team describes as an ancient skull cult. Gresky and her colleagues found three skulls scored with deep cuts made by sharpened stones. The carvings bisect the center of the face,...

The World's Oldest Known Temple Was Home to a ‘Skull Cult’

3 months agoHumor / odd : Neatorama

Göbekli Tepe in southern Turkey is a temple that has been dated to more than 11,000 years ago, making it the oldest known temple in the world. Recent findings there include human skull fragments from three individuals that were intentionally carved, painted, and even had holes drilled into them. Show More Summary

Remains from “skull cult” discovered at world’s oldest stone monuments

At Göbekli Tepe in Turkey, a 11,500 year-old monumental construction was decorated with human skulls.

Dead heads: Turkish site reveals more evidence of neolithic 'skull cult'

Fragments of three skulls found at Göbekli Tepe have hallmarks of being carved with flint after being scalped and defleshed first Fragments of carved bone unearthed at an ancient site on a Turkish hillside are evidence that the people...Show More Summary

Scientists Think These Ancient Carvings Depict an Apocalyptic Comet Impact

Deciphering the mysterious “Vulture Stone” at the 11,500-year-old ruins of Göbekli Tepe.

Younger Dryas comet impact encoded in Göbekli Tepe?

Fascinating if true.Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry, Vol. 17, No 1, (2017), pp. 233-250 DECODING GÖBEKLI TEPE WITH ARCHAEOASTRONOMY: WHAT DOES THE FOX SAY? Martin B. Sweatman and Dimitrios Tsikritsis We have interpreted much of the symbolism of Göbekli Tepe in terms of astronomical events. Show More Summary

HMNS Weekly Happenings!

7 months agoArts / Museums : Beyond Bones

  Lecture – Solving the Mystery of Göbekli Tepe: The Oldest Temple on Earth? by Mehmet Ozdogan Wikipedia.   Some of the magnificent statues, pillars, temples and reliefs uncovered at Göbekli Tepe in southeastern Turkey date back an astonishing 14,000 years–predating Stonehenge by 6,000 years. In fact, they are the most magnificent and best-preserved artifacts […]

Big News for the 'Oldest Monument Known to Mankind'

US archaeologists surveying the site of Göbekli Tepe in Turkey's southeastern Anatolia region in the 1960s deemed it unremarkable. Three decades later, the late German archaeologist Klaus Schmidt opted to investigate anyway. What he found beneath the earth was astounding: towering T-shape and spiked limestone pillars with animals carved into...

11.24 – MU Podcast

Andrew Collins joins us to discuss his new research on Göbekli Tepe and the Genesis of the Gods.  Who were the mysterious, elite group of peoples that ruled over the human population at the end of the last Ice Age? What drove them to build such elaborate monuments...

Episode 8.07 – Mysterious Universe Plus+

We start by dispelling some modern myths before delivering a collection of ancient history news with the UK’s “Moonhenge” and updates from Göbekli Tepe. Some serious discussion on the high strangeness conjured within Crop Circles is then discussed before we dive headfirst into a whirlwind of madness with...

Careless Archaeologists?

The focus of this seems to be Gobekli Tepe, a Neolithic site in Turkey which is frequently in the news, and which is a bit outside of the purview of this blog, but the issues aren’t … from Hurriyet: Some of the archaeologists currently working at excavation sites around Turkey are not taking their job [...]

Göbekli Tepe: feasting, beer, and the emergence of the Neolithic

This is a very interesting paper which suggests that collective work accompanied by feasting played an important role in the creation of Göbekli Tepe. The site taxed hunter-gatherer resources, since it required the combined labor of many people from a wide area to erect. Show More Summary

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC