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Study Finds All Mammals Take ~12 Seconds to Poo

Based on my time in academia, I would have thought funding for research was difficult to come by. Apparently, funding is no problem at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where researchers have been busy watching animals poo and examining said poo – all in the name of...

PowerPoint & LED projector enable new technique for self-folding origami

(Georgia Institute of Technology) Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Peking University have found a new use for the ubiquitous PowerPoint slide: Producing self-folding three-dimensional origami structures from photocurable liquid polymers.

'First arrival' hypothesis in Darwin's finches gets some caveats

(Georgia Institute of Technology) Being first in a new ecosystem provides major advantages for pioneering species, but the benefits may depend on just how competitive later-arriving species are. That is among the conclusions in a new...Show More Summary

All mammals take ~12 seconds to poop.

If the above image disturbs you, move along; this post is not for you! In this study, published this week in the journal Soft Matter (yes, seriously), scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology report their detailed studies of the pooping habits of a wide variety of mammals. Show More Summary

New interface allows more efficient, faster technique to remotely operate robots

(Georgia Institute of Technology) A new interface designed by Georgia Institute of Technology researchers allows users to simply point and click on an item, then choose a grasp, to control a robot remotely.

Landslides on Ceres reflect hidden ice

(Georgia Institute of Technology) Massive landslides, similar to those found on Earth, are occurring on the asteroid Ceres. That's according to a new study that adds to the growing evidence that Ceres retains a significant amount of water ice.

Landslides on Ceres reflect hidden ice

Massive landslides, similar to those found on Earth, are occurring on the asteroid Ceres. That's according to a new study led by the Georgia Institute of Technology, adding to the growing evidence that Ceres retains a significant amount of water ice.

Behind the iron curtain: How methane-making microbes kept the early Earth warm

(Georgia Institute of Technology) Using mud pulled from the bottom of a tropical lake, researchers at have gained a new grasp of how ancient microbes made methane in the complex iron chemistry of the early Earth.

Swinging robot inspired by sloths could help future farmers

Over 7 billion people live on Earth, which means feeding our growing population will require us to produce food more efficiently than we are now. Could Robots could help us ramp up food production? Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) scientists believe so. Show More Summary

Study shows lower pitched sounds lead audiences to believe products are larger

Lower pitches in voices or music in advertisements lead consumers to infer a larger product size, according to a new study by researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology and Vanderbilt University.

Two early career researchers honored with Alan T. Waterman Award

(National Science Foundation) The National Science Foundation (NSF) today recognized Baratunde 'Bara' A. Cola of the Georgia Institute of Technology and John V. Pardon of Princeton University with the nation's highest honor for early career scientists and engineers, the Alan T. Show More Summary

4-D printing gets simpler and faster

(Singapore University of Technology and Design) A group of researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design, Georgia Institute of Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong University and Zhejiang University has introduced an approach...Show More Summary

New 3-D printing method creates shape-shifting objects

(Georgia Institute of Technology) A team of researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology and two other institutions has developed a new 3-D printing method to create objects that can permanently transform into a range of different shapes in response to heat.

Hair spacing keeps honeybees clean during pollination

(Georgia Institute of Technology) A honeybee can carry up to 30 percent of its body weight in pollen because of the strategic spacing of its nearly three million hairs. The gap between each eye hair is approximately the same size as a grain of dandelion pollen, which is typically collected by bees. Show More Summary

The electric sands of Titan: The grains that cover Saturn's moon act like clingy packing peanuts

Experiments led by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology suggest the particles that cover the surface of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, are "electrically charged." When the wind blows hard enough (approximately 15 mph), Titan's non-silicate granules get kicked up and start to hop in a motion referred to as saltation. Show More Summary

Electric grains make Titan a top destination for sand castle builders

last monthTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

It turns out that fizzy lakes may not be the only oddity offered up by Saturn's largest moon. Scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology say that Titan may also be home to electric sand that rolls around in the wind and forms clumps that cling together for long periods of time. Show More Summary

The electric sands of Titan

(Georgia Institute of Technology) Experiments suggest the particles that cover the surface of Saturn's moon, Titan, are 'electrically charged.' When the wind blows hard enough, Titan's non-silicate granules get kicked up and start to hop in a motion. Show More Summary

The Surface of Saturn's Titan is Electrically Charged --"It's a Strange, Electrostatically Sticky World"

"Titan's extreme physical environment requires scientists to think differently about what we've learned of Earth's granular dynamics," said Josef Dufek, with the Georgia Institute of Technology. "Landforms are influenced by forces that aren't intuitive to us because those forces aren't...        

Surprising twist in confined liquid crystals: A simple route to developing new sensors

Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have found a material used for decades to color food items ranging from corn chips to ice creams could potentially have uses far beyond food dyes.

Surprising twist in confined liquid crystals: A simple route to developing new sensors

(Georgia Institute of Technology) Researchers at Georgia Tech found that a class of water soluble liquid crystals, called lyotropic chromonic liquid crystals, exhibited unexpected characteristics that could be harnessed for use in sensors and other potential applications.

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