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Make Way for Hemoglobin

Harvard Medical School researchers have identified the mechanism behind red blood cell specialization. Their findings could spark the development of new treatments for blood disorders and cancers.

Make way for hemoglobin

(Harvard Medical School) Harvard Medical School researchers have identified the mechanism behind red blood cell specialization and revealed that it is controlled by an enzyme called UBE2O. This finding could spark the development of new treatments for blood disorders and cancers.

UH receives $3.3 million from state cancer research program

(University of Houston) The University of Houston has received $3.3 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, including $2 million to hire Rohith Reddy, a post-doctoral researcher at Harvard Medical School who...Show More Summary

Mind Flex

New research from Harvard Medical School casts doubt on the prevailing model of memory formation, suggesting that the brain may be far more flexible and less rigid in the way it incorporates, stores and recalls information.

Mind flex

(Harvard Medical School) The human brain has a region of cells responsible for linking sensory cues to actions and behaviors and cataloging the link as a memory. Cells that form these links have been deemed highly stable and fixed.Now,...Show More Summary

One-fifth of Americans say their workplace is hostile or threatening, study finds

The American workplace is grueling, stressful and surprisingly hostile. So concludes an in-depth study of 3,066 U.S. workers by Rand Corp., Harvard Medical School and UCLA. Among the findings: • Nearly one in five workers — a share the study calls “disturbingly high” — say they face a hostile or...

One-fifth of Americans find workplace hostile or threatening

The American workplace is grueling, stressful and surprisingly hostile. So concludes an in-depth study of 3,066 U.S. workers by the Rand Corp., Harvard Medical School and the University of California, … Click to Continue »

Doctors from Elite Schools Prescribe Fewer Opioids

Doctors from the lowest-ranked U.S. medical schools are three times as likely to prescribe opioids as those trained at Harvard, the top-ranked U.S. school, according to a new research paper. Why it matters: The authors argue that doctor training is an overlooked driver of the American opiate epidemic. Show More Summary

A Hard Bargain

Americans extol price shopping for health care as a prudent idea, yet few actually do it even when given the means to, according to the findings of two separate studies led by investigators at Harvard Medical School.

New botulinum neurotoxin discovered -- potential to treat a number of medical conditions

(Stockholm University) The first new botulinum neurotoxin in almost half a century has been discovered by researchers at Stockholm University and Harvard Medical School. Botulinum toxins are widely used to treat a growing list of medical conditions. The article has been published in Nature Communications.

Prediciting TB's behavior

(Harvard Medical School) Research led by scientists at Harvard Medical School reveals that when it comes to predicting response to treatment and risk of dying, molecular tests that detect resistance to a class of TB drugs known as fluoroquinolones may be as good and even superior to traditional drug-sensitivity tests conducted in lab cultures.

Study identifies enzyme that protects cells from toxic fat

A new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Howard Hughes Medical Institute sheds light on how a key fat-producing enzyme helps protect cells from a toxic form of fat.

The Healthcare Messaging Conference & Exhibition

Venue and dates secured! Wednesday and Thursday, November 29-30, 2017 in Boston Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School This site has a great auditorium and breakout rooms for the three tracks of presentations and post-conference workshops we have planned. There are over 30 speaker slots planned covering many of the big messaging use cases […]

Optimization for self-production may explain mysterious features of the ribosome

(Harvard Medical School) New study explains previously mysterious characteristics of ribosomes, the protein production factories of the cell. Researchers mathematically demonstrate that ribosomes are precisely structured to build themselves as quickly as possible to support efficient cell growth.

Optimization for self-production may explain mysterious features of the ribosome

Optimization for self-production may explain key features of ribosomes, the protein production factories of the cell, reported researchers from Harvard Medical School in Nature on July 20.

Coffee with a 'Viagra-like' ingredient was just recalled, and it reveals a bigger problem

On the back of virtually any bottle of supplements are two words that strike fear into the heart of Harvard Medical School assistant professor Pieter Cohen: "Proprietary blend." The words are printed beneath the bold lettering that claims to list the supplement's ingredients. Show More Summary

New study reveals contrasts in how groups of neurons function during decision making

(Harvard Medical School) A new study in mice trained to perform a sound identification task in a virtual reality maze reveals contrasts in how groups of neurons in different regions of the brain function during decision making.

New study suggests blueprint for adult visual system is present at birth

(Harvard Medical School) Harvard Medical School research reveals the presence of a blueprint for the complex visual system already present at birth. The observations shed light on a long-standing mystery about how and when certain cardinal features of the visual system develop.

Microscopy technique could enable more informative biopsies

MIT and Harvard Medical School researchers have devised a way to image biopsy samples with much higher resolution—an advance that could help doctors develop more accurate and inexpensive diagnostic tests.

Mature cells revert to stem cells to boost tissue regeneration and repair in mouse intestines

Researchers at Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School have identified a previously unknown mechanism that plays an important role in the regeneration of the inner intestinal lining. Their findings provide new insights on how this tissue, which undergoes change on a daily basis, maintains itself.

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