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New study reveals breast cancer cells recycle their own ammonia waste as fuel

At a glance: Breast cancer cells secrete ammonia as a byproduct of cellular metabolism, which accumulates in the tumor's surrounding environment. New study in mice and cultured tumor cells by Harvard Medical School researchers reveals...Show More Summary

New study reveals breast cancer cells recycle their own ammonia waste as fuel

(Harvard Medical School) Breast cancer cells recycle ammonia, a waste byproduct of cell metabolism, and use it as a source of nitrogen to fuel tumor growth, report scientists from Harvard Medical School. The insights shed light on the biological role of ammonia in cancer and may inform the design of new therapeutic strategies to slow tumor growth.

Oncotarget: Researchers identify novel therapeutic strategy for drug-resistant thyroid cancers

(Chempetitive Group) New findings by a Harvard Medical School team suggest that palbociclib, a drug that is FDA-approved to treat advanced breast cancer, may be able to overcome vemurafenib resistance in PTC.

Brain training shows promise for patients with bipolar disorder

(McLean Hospital) Researchers at McLean Hospital, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, have discovered for the first time that computerized brain training can result in improved cognitive skills in individuals with bipolar disord...

A dean of admissions on affirmative action in medical school

The news that the Department of Justice is supporting a case against affirmative action at Harvard has led me to reflect on my 38 years of experience in admissions at a New York medical school. When I started out in the late seventies, affirmative action legislation had already been in place for a decade. One of its […]

"Wired" bandage delivers meds on a schedule

2 weeks agoTechnology / Gadgets : Gizmag

Imagine if a wound dressing could release fresh doses of medication over time, or even different types of medication at specific times. Well, researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Harvard Medical School and MIT have developed...Show More Summary

Harvard Medical School Scientists Receive NIH Director's Awards

Four Harvard Medical School scientists are among 86 recipients nationwide honored by the National Institutes of Health High-Risk, High-Reward Research Program.

Smart bandage could promote better, faster healing

Researchers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Harvard Medical School and MIT have designed a smart bandage that could eventually heal chronic wounds or battlefield injuries with every fiber of its being.

Wear Your Health on Your Sleeve With Color-Changing Tattoo

2 weeks agoTechnology / Gadgets : Geek.com

At the corner of science and art, you’ll find smart tattoo ink: a burgeoning technology capable of monitoring health by changing color. Researchers at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and MIT’s Media Lab in […] The post Wear Your Health on Your Sleeve With Color-Changing Tattoo appeared first on Geek.com.

New study from Harvard examines gender differences in obtaining first NIH research award

(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A study of more than 5,400 instructors and assistant professors at Harvard Medical School compared differences between males and females for receipt of their first National Institutes of Health research award.

Harvard event aims to combat opioid crisis through education

Harvard Medical School will be hosting a symposium to explore the state of the opioid crisis and ways to stem it. The school says a panel of medical experts will … Click to Continue »

How to grow a spine

(Harvard Medical School) In a paper published Sept. 21 in Cell, Harvard Medical School genetics professor Olivier Pourquié -- whose lab discovered the segmentation clock 20 years ago -- and colleagues report that they used mouse cells...Show More Summary

How to Grow a Spine

Working with mouse cells, Harvard Medical School scientists have successfully recreated the segmentation clock that drives spine formation during embryonic development. Insights can illuminate normal spine development, understanding of spinal malformations such as scoliosis and spina bifida.

How the Anal Cancer Epidemic in Gay and Bi HIV-Positive Men Can Be Prevented

3 weeks agoLGBT / Gay : Towleroad

By Ashish A. Deshmukh, Assistant Professor, University of Florida, Elizabeth Chiao, Associate professor, Baylor College of Medicine, Jagpreet Chhatwal, Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School, and Scott B. Cantor, Professor, The University of T… Read The post How the Anal Cancer Epidemic in Gay and Bi HIV-Positive Men Can Be Prevented appeared first on Towleroad.

Foot Pain? New Study Says Look at Hip and Knee for Complete Diagnosis

A study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery and Harvard Medical School suggests new guidelines may be in order for evaluating and treating lower extremity pain. They found a significant association between foot pain and knee or hip pain.

Foot pain? New study says look at hip and knee for complete diagnosis

(Hospital for Special Surgery) A study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery and Harvard Medical School suggests new guidelines may be in order for evaluating and treating lower extremity pain. Investigators set out to determine...Show More Summary

An interconnection between the nervous and immune system

(Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin) Working with colleagues from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE ), Harvard Medical School and Ohio State University, researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have...Show More Summary

You're not alone in feeling alone

Feel like everyone else has more friends than you do? You're not alone— but merely believing this is true could affect your happiness. A new study from the University of British Columbia, Harvard Business School and Harvard Medical School...Show More Summary

$40 Keychain Device Detects Food Allergens

For those with allergic reactions to certain foods, cross-contamination or accidental mislabeling can lead to reactions ranging from annoying to life-threatening. To address this health need, researchers at Harvard Medical School have made a device that can quickly, inexpensively, and accurately detect common food antigens. Show More Summary

To improve health monitoring, simply trip the 'nanoswitch'

(Boston Children's Hospital) A team of researchers from Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Harvard's Wyss Institute have adapted their DNA nanoswitch technology -- previously demonstrated to aid drug discovery and...Show More Summary

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