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Soft robot helps the heart beat

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard University and Boston Children's Hospital researchers have developed a customizable soft robot that fits around a heart and helps it beat, potentially opening new treatment options for people suffering from heart failure.

Multiregional brain on a chip

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard University researchers have developed a multiregional brain-on-a-chip that models the connectivity between three distinct regions of the brain. The in vitro...Show More Summary

The false choice of basic vs. applied research

A new call to abolish the concept of "applied research" comes from a surprising source: the founding dean of Harvard's John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).

Mimicking biological movements with soft robots

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Designing a soft robot to move organically -- to bend like a finger or twist like a wrist -- has always been a process of trial and error. Now, Harvard researchers have developed a method to automatically design soft actuators based on the desired movement.

World’s smallest radio is the size of 2 atoms

last monthNews : The Raw Story

Lola Gayle, STEAM Register Researchers have unveiled a radio receiver which they say is the smallest in the world. The radio, developed at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), is built out of an assembly of atomic-scale defects in pink diamonds that are...

World's smallest radio receiver has building blocks the size of two atoms

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have made the world's smallest radio receiver - built out of an assembly of atomic-scale defects in pink diamonds.

World's smallest radio receiver has building blocks the size of 2 atoms

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have made the world's smallest radio receiver -- built out of an assembly of atomic-scale defects in pink diamonds. Show More Summary

Scientists Develop Aerosol to Repair Ozone Layer

A way to cool the planet from greenhouse gases while simultaneously repairing the ozone layer has been developed by scientists. Researchers from Harvard’s John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) identified an...Show More Summary

Mitigating the risk of geoengineering

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have identified an aerosol for solar geoengineering that may be able to cool the planet while simultaneously repairing ozone damage.

A new technique for structural color, inspired by birds

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Structural coloration has long interested researchers and engineers because of its durability and potential for application in solar arrays, biomimetic tissues and adaptive camouflage. Show More Summary

Human health risks from hydroelectric projects

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) In a new study, Harvard University researchers find over 90 percent of potential new Canadian hydroelectric projects are likely to increase concentrations of the neurotoxin methylmercury in food webs near indigenous communities.

Creating a slippery slope on the surface of medical implants

(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A team led at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University,...Show More Summary

Making every cell matter

(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A team from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS)...Show More Summary

3-D-printed organ-on-a-chip with integrated sensors

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Researchers have made the first entirely 3-D-printed organ-on-a-chip with integrated sensing. Built by a fully automated, digital manufacturing process, the 3-D-printed heart-on-a-chip can be quickly fabricated and customized. Show More Summary

Physicists pass spin information through a superconductor

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have made a discovery that could lay the foundation for quantum superconducting devices. Their breakthrough solves one the main challenges to quantum computing: how to transmit spin information through superconducting materials.

A new spin on superconductivity

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have made a discovery that could lay the foundation for quantum superconducting devices. Show More Summary

How and why researchers revised the genetic recipe for E. coli

esearchers in the laboratory of George Church, Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School and a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard, are working to produce the most modified bacterial genome to date. Show More Summary

New spin on nanofibers

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Researchers have developed a new method to make nanofibers that could lead to stronger, more durable bulletproof vests and armor and more robust cellular scaffolding for tissue repair.

Women in Business Q&A: Jaunique Sealey, CEO, Cosmedicine

Jaunique Sealey continues to build a distinct reputation when it comes to her career. A graduate of Harvard Law and Duke University School of Engineering, having held prominent positions in the music industry with a specialty in technology,...Show More Summary

Nanotechnology and Math Deliver Two-in-One Punch for Cancer Therapy Resistance

Math, biology and nanotechnology are becoming strange, yet effective bed-fellows in the fight against cancer treatment resistance. Researchers at the University of Waterloo and Harvard Medical School have engineered a revolutionary new approach to cancer treatment that pits a lethal combination of drugs together into a single nanoparticle.

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