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Mimicking birdsongs

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a simple device that mimics complex birdsongs. The device uses air blown through a stretched rubber tube to recreate birdsongs found in nature, including the songs of zebra and Bengalese finches.

Researchers develop simple device to recreate complex birdsongs

Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a simple device that mimics complex birdsongs. The device, developed by the group of L. Mahadevan, the Lola England de Valpine Professor...Show More Summary

Harvard-Osher integrative medicine's mind-body partnership with JACM

(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) The Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital has engaged a partnership with JACM, The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine to highlight the best new research in the mushrooming field of mind-body medicine.

Harvard researchers develop tough, self-healing rubber

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Imagine a tire that could heal after being punctured or a rubber band that never snapped. Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new type of rubber that is as tough as natural rubber but can also self-heal.

How future volcanic eruptions will impact Earth's ozone layer

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) The next major volcanic eruption could kick-start chemical reactions that would seriously damage the planet's already besieged ozone layer. The extent of damage toShow More Summary

Smaller, smarter, softer robotic arm for endoscopic surgery

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Researchers from Harvard University have developed a hybrid rigid-soft robotic arm for endoscopes with integrated sensing, flexibility, and multiple degrees of freedom. Show More Summary

Safely releasing genetically modified genes into the wild

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) So, you've genetically engineered a malaria-resistant mosquito, now what? How many mosquitos would you need to replace the disease-carrying wild type? What is the most...Show More Summary

How bacteria maintain and recover their shape

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Bacteria have an extraordinary ability to maintain and recover their morphology even after being twisted out of shape. Researchers know that shape is determined by the cell wall, yet little is known about how bacteria monitor and control it. Show More Summary

Researchers develop technique to control and measure electron spin voltage

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Information technologies of the future will likely use electron spin -- rather than electron charge -- to carry information. But first, scientists need to better understand how to control spin and learn to build the spin equivalent of electronic components and tools. Show More Summary

Reconciling predictions of climate change

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard researchers have resolved a major conflict in estimates of how much the Earth will warm in response to a doubling of CO2 in the atmosphere -- finding that the...Show More Summary

How eggs got their shapes

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) The evolution of the amniotic egg -- complete with membrane and shell -- was key to vertebrates leaving the oceans and colonizing the land and air but how bird eggs evolved into so many different shapes and sizes has long been a mystery. Show More Summary

Learning about nutrition from 'food porn' and online quizzes

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard and Columbia researchers designed an online experiment to test how people learn about nutrition in the context of a social, online quiz.

First flat lens for immersion microscope provides alternative to centuries-old technique

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) A team of researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has developed the first flat lens for immersion microscopy....Show More Summary

Immersion meta-lenses at visible wavelengths for nanoscale imaging

A team of researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has developed the first flat lens for immersion microscopy. This lens, which can be designed for any liquid, may provide a cost-effective and easy-to-manufacture alternative to the expensive, centuries-old technique of hand polishing lenses for immersion objectives.

The science behind making the perfect pitch

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Applied mathematicians at the Harvard SEAS used mathematical models to figure out the best strategies to throw something at a target. The team found that while underhand...Show More Summary

Technique makes more efficient, independent holograms

Not far from where Edwin Land—the inventor of the Polaroid camera—made his pioneering discoveries about polarized light, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are continuing to unlock the power of polarization.

Technique makes more efficient, independent holograms

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Recently, a team of researchers encoded multiple holographic images in a metasurface that can be unlocked separately with differently polarized light.

Sculpting optical microstructures with slight changes in chemistry

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) In 2013, materials scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering, grew a garden of self-assembled crystal microstructures. Show More Summary

Sculpting optical microstructures with slight changes in chemistry

In 2013, materials scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering, grew a garden of self-assembled crystal microstructures. Now, applied mathematicians at SEAS and Wyss have developed a framework to better understand and control the fabrication of these microstructures.

Solving the mystery of the Arctic's green ice

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) In 2011, researchers observed something that should be impossible -- a massive bloom of phytoplankton growing under Arctic sea ice in conditions that should have been far too dark for anything requiring photosynthesis to survive. Show More Summary

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