Trend Results : Helmholtz Zentrum München


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Novel histone modifications couple metabolism to gene activity

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU) have discovered that two new classes of histone modifications couple cellular metabolism to gene activity. The study was published in 'Nature Structural and Molecular Biology'.

Novel histone modifications couple metabolism to gene activity

Scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU) have discovered that two new classes of histone modifications couple cellular metabolism to gene activity. The study was published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology.

How obesity promotes breast cancer

Obesity leads to the release of cytokines into the bloodstream which impact the metabolism of breast cancer cells, making them more aggressive as a result. Scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München, Technische Universität München (TUM), and Heidelberg University Hospital report on this in 'Cell Metabolism'. Show More Summary

How obesity promotes breast cancer

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Obesity leads to the release of cytokines into the bloodstream which impact the metabolism of breast cancer cells, making them more aggressive as a result....Show More Summary

Tracking live brain activity with the new NeuBtracker open-source microscope

A team of scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has successfully developed a new type of microscope. The NeuBtracker is an open source microscope that can observe neuronal activities of zebrafish without perturbing their behavior. Show More Summary

Tracking live brain activity with the new NeuBtracker open-source microscope

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) A team of scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has successfully developed a new type of microscope. The...Show More Summary

How the lungs of premature babies can undergo damage

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Premature babies that need ventilation to support their breathing often suffer from a condition known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Researchers at the Helmholtz...Show More Summary

Cancer drug stimulates tripolar mode of mitosis

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Taxanes inhibit cell division and make cancer cells sensitive to radiation therapy. A current study has investigated the underlying mechanisms of this action - and which biomarkers may be useful for predicting the success of therapy. Show More Summary

Immune cells help fat deal with environmental challenges

Immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells play an important role in the functioning of adipose tissue. This is the discovery of scientists from the Helmholtz Diabetes Center (HDC) at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM). Their findings are published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Immune cells help fat deal with environmental challenges

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells play an important role in the functioning of adipose tissue. This is the discovery of scientists from the Helmholtz Diabetes Center at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich. Their findings are published in the journal Cell Metabolism.

Paint by numbers

Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a new method for reconstructing continuous biological processes, such as disease progression, using image data. The study was published in 'Nature Communications'.

Paint by numbers

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a new method for reconstructing continuous biological processes, such as disease progression, using image data. The study was published in 'Nature Communications'.

Algorithm reconstructs processes from individual images

Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a new method for reconstructing continuous biological processes, such as disease progression, using image data. The study was published in Nature Communications.

Repetitive elements shape embryonic chromatin landscape

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Retrotransposons are repetitive elements that form almost half of the mammalian genome. Even though they are so common, they have previously been considered to be fairly insignificant. Show More Summary

Long-term diabetes complication: Liver inflammation raises cholesterol levels

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Inflammatory processes in the liver lead to elevated cholesterol levels in people with diabetes, thus promoting subsequent vascular diseases. This is the result...Show More Summary

Cell aging in lung epithelial cells

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Pulmonary fibrosis can possibly be attributed to a kind of cellular aging process, which is called senescence. This has been shown by researchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Lung Research. Show More Summary

COPD -- changes in the lungs, changes in the microbiome

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can result in structural changes within the lungs over time. Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have now been able to show that these changes not only affect the organ itself, but also the bacteria that live in the lung. Show More Summary

Well-being in later life: The mind plays an important role

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Well-being in later life is largely dependent on psychosocial factors. Physical impairments tend to play a secondary role, as scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have discovered. The results of their recent study are published in BMC Geriatrics.

Infections in early life associated with increased risk for Celiac disease

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Infections during infancy are associated with increased risk for gluten intolerance (celiac disease) later on. Apparently the risk is particularly high in the case of repeated gastrointestinal infections in the first year of life. Show More Summary

New approach in T-cell therapy to treat cancer

(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Scientists have armed immune cells with a new surface molecule. This causes the cells to respond particularly aggressively when they encounter a protein that tumors actually use to camouflage themselves from the immune system. Show More Summary

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