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Team maps genome of black blow fly; may benefit human health, advance pest management

Researchers at the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis have sequenced the genome of the black blow fly, an insect commonly found throughout the United States, southern Canada and parts of northern Europe.

IUPUI maps genome of black blow fly; may benefit human health, advance pest management

(Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis School of Science) Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis researchers have sequenced genome of black blow flies, insects that have environmental, medical and forensic uses, functioning as nature's recyclers, as wound cleansers and as forensic timekeepers.

Mutation types in diverse cancers associated with smoking

(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Researchers have surveyed thousands of genomes of human tumors from smokers and nonsmokers and identified mutational signatures that are associated with tobacco smoke; for example,...Show More Summary

Genome sequencing reveals ancient interbreeding between chimpanzees and bonobos

For the first time, scientists have revealed ancient gene mixing between chimpanzees and bonobos, mankind's closest relatives, showing parallels with Neanderthal mixing in human ancestry. Published today in the journal Science, the study...Show More Summary

Ethics and genetics: opening the book of life – Science Weekly podcast

When it comes to the ethics of genetic technologies who decides how far we should go in our pursuit for perfection? In 2001, the journal Nature published the first sequenced human genome. Hailed by many as the greatest achievement of...Show More Summary

Strange 'chimeras' defy science's understanding of human genetics

(University of Virginia Health System) The human genome is far more complex than thought, with genes functioning in an unexpected fashion that scientists have wrongly assumed must indicate cancer, research indicates.

Not Cancer: Chimeric RNA Defy Science’s Understanding of Human Genetics

The human genome is far more complex than thought, with genes functioning in an unexpected fashion that scientists have wrongly assumed must indicate cancer, according to a new paper on what is called chimeric RNA – genetic material that results when genes on two different chromosomes produce "fusion" RNA in a way scientists say shouldn’t happen. Show More Summary

Genes, Chance And Destiny: Siddhartha Mukherjee Chronicles The Human Genome’s Turbulent Future

Genes, Chance and Destiny: Siddhartha Mukherjee Chronicles the Human Genome’s Turbulent Future At 46, Siddhartha Mukherjee, is a man driven by questions, by puzzles in science and society. In 2011, his first book, a 600-page book on the history of cancer, The Emperor of All Maladies, won a Pulitzer Prize, among other accolades. Show More Summary

Genes, Chance And Destiny: Siddhartha Mukherjee Chronicles The Human Genome’s Turbulent Future

Genes, Chance and Destiny: Siddhartha Mukherjee Chronicles the Human Genome’s Turbulent Future At 46, Siddhartha Mukherjee, is a man driven by questions, by puzzles in science and society. In 2011, his first book, a 600-page book on the history of cancer, The Emperor of All Maladies, won a Pulitzer Prize, among other accolades. Show More Summary

Researchers use expanded computing power to accelerate big-data science

What do the human brain, the 3 billion base-pair human genome and a tiny cube of 216 atoms have in common?

A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived review – popular science at its best

Adam Rutherford’s elegant account of the Human Genome Project brings a note of realism to our dreams of a medical revolution Sixteen years ago, British researcher Ewan Birney launched an unusual sweepstake. At the time, scientists were completing the Human Genome Project, the international effort to unravel the genetic makeup of human beings. Show More Summary

Genetics Behind Response to Parkinson’s Drugs

Since achieving the goals of the “mission impossible” Human Genome Project in 2003, biomedical sciences entered the new era of genetically informed use of pharmaceuticals. The Project helped in our understanding of how genes affect an individual’s response to drugs. Although it was known for decades that the response to drugs depends on genetic background […]

Ancient virus could determine the sex of your baby

The sex of baby mice—and quite likely baby humans—is determined by a virus that inserted itself into the mammalian genome 1.5 million years ago, Live Science reports.        

Ancient Virus Could Determine the Sex of Your Baby

The sex of baby mice—and quite likely baby humans—is determined by a virus that inserted itself into the mammalian genome 1.5 million years ago, Live Science reports. Yale researchers published their surprising findings this week in Nature. According to a press release, more than 40% of the...

From Denisovan DNA to Future Humanity

The idea that the genomes of those of us without African ancestry harbor some DNA from Neanderthals has inspired cartoons and jokes, and I got a lot of flak when DNA Science covered the discovery of

Harmful mutations have accumulated during early human migrations out of Africa

The researchers analysed genomes of individuals across four continents while former studies had only been carried out on two populations. The study has now been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. read ...

Links 10/6/15

Links for you. Science: Chagas: An Emerging Infectious Disease Threat In U.S. Human Genome Project: Twenty-five years of big biology The Future Will Be Full of Mushroom Batteries If Your iPhone Were Powered By… In vitro evaluation of dual carbapenem … Continue reading ?

What 2,500 Sequenced Genomes Say About Humanity’s Future

Sequencing the first 2,500 human genomes has been a long, hard process. Here's what science has learned about the ways humans are different. The post What 2,500 Sequenced Genomes Say About Humanity’s Future appeared first on WIRED.

Links 9/15/15

Links for you. Science: Antibiotic resistance: myths and misunderstandings (excellent) Big Data: Astronomical or Genomical? How Europeans evolved white skin Crowdsourcing digs up an early human species: Palaeoanthropologist invites excavators and anatomists to study richest fossil trove in Africa. This … Continue reading ?

Human genome editing research is essential, experts say

A consensus statement from global experts in bioethics, stem cell research and science policy, asserts that human genome editing research is essential to scientific knowledge and should be permitted, and there may be morally acceptable uses of the technology in human reproduction.

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