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Cellular recycling caught in the act

(Institute for Basic Science) Scientists at the Center for Self-assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), have observed a normal physiological process, called 'self-eating', that cells use to recycle their components. Show More Summary

Cellular recycling caught in the act

A team of researchers at the Center for Self-assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have observed a normal physiological process, called "self-eating", that cells use to recycle their components. They developed...Show More Summary

Major discovery in controlling quantum states of single atoms

Researchers at the Center for Quantum Nanoscience within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have made a major breakthrough in controlling the quantum properties of single atoms. In an international collaboration with IBM ResearchShow More Summary

Versatile sensor against tumor initiating cells

(Institute for Basic Science) The IBS researchers developed the first fluorescent sensor to visualize TICs. Functional in lung, central nervous system, melanoma, breast, renal, ovarian, colon, and prostate cancer cell cultures, this could become a useful tool for biopsy-free post-treatment assessment and anti-TIC drug development.

Multiresponsive nanosurfactant constructs tiny chemical factory

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists have made a surfactant based on nanoparticle dimers, which is responsive to multiple stimuli. The nanosurfactant combines several characteristics of each 'active' molecular surfactant which allows a tremendous flexibility whereby liquid droplets can be manipulated.

From C-H to C-C at room temperature

(Institute for Basic Science) By oxidizing the iridium center of the reaction intermediate, IBS scientists achieve arylation of C-H bonds at mild conditions.

Catching radical molecules before they disappear

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS researchers managed to stabilize short-lived radical ions which could be used for rechargeable batteries.

Ultrathin and flat graphene metalenses gain more properties

On the quest for miniaturization, scientists at the Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), in collaboration with researchers from the University of Birmingham and the Korea...Show More Summary

Gel to fight rheumatoid arthritis

IBS scientists at the Center for Self-Assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), invented a hydrogel to fight rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases. Published in Advanced Materials, this jelly-like material could be used to absorb extra fluids in swelling joints and release drugs.

Scientists develop potentially therapeutic gel, which detects nitric oxide, absorbs excess fluids and delivers drugs

IBS scientists at the Center for Self-Assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), invented a hydrogel to fight rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases. Published in Advanced Materials, this jelly-like material could be used to absorb extra fluids in swelling joints and release drugs.

Gel to fight rheumatoid arthritis

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists developed a potentially therapeutic gel, which detects nitric oxide, absorbs excess fluids and delivers drugs.

Naked molecules dancing in liquid become visible

Capturing the movement of molecules is not an easy task. Scientists at the Center for Soft and Living Matter, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) were able to observe the movement of molecules stored inside a graphene pocket without the need to stain them. Show More Summary

How eyes get clogged in glaucoma and how to free them

Researchers at the Center for Vascular Research, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), have identified a new mechanism involved in the development and progression of glaucoma, and found a potential therapeutic option to treat it. Show More Summary

2-D Electronics' metal or semiconductor? Both

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS researchers produced the first 2-D field-effect transistor (FET) made of a single material.

How new blood vessels sprout

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS biologists discovered a key regulator of normal as well as pathological formation of new blood vessels.

Sorting complicated knots

(Institute for Basic Science) Delving into an untapped area of mathematics, IBS mathematicians provide a new operation for a particular type of knots.

Controlling memory by triggering specific brain waves during sleep

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS researchers find that manipulating the pulses of electrical activity in the thalamus during non-REM deep sleep make mice remember or forget

Protein mingling under blue light

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists developed a new faster and more efficient optogenetic tool to manipulate protein clusters under blue light.

Model for multivalley polaritons

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists model the formation of multivalleys in semiconductor microcavities, bringing new ideas to the emerging valleytronics field.

Mapping DROSHA's cleavage sites

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists develop a new method to understand what and where the DROSHA protein is cutting.

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