Trend Results : Institute for Basic Science IBS


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Naked molecules dancing in liquid become visible

Capturing the movement of molecules is not an easy task. Scientists at the Center for Soft and Living Matter, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) were able to observe the movement of molecules stored inside a graphene pocket without the need to stain them. Show More Summary

How eyes get clogged in glaucoma and how to free them

Researchers at the Center for Vascular Research, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), have identified a new mechanism involved in the development and progression of glaucoma, and found a potential therapeutic option to treat it. Show More Summary

2-D Electronics' metal or semiconductor? Both

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS researchers produced the first 2-D field-effect transistor (FET) made of a single material.

How new blood vessels sprout

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS biologists discovered a key regulator of normal as well as pathological formation of new blood vessels.

Sorting complicated knots

(Institute for Basic Science) Delving into an untapped area of mathematics, IBS mathematicians provide a new operation for a particular type of knots.

Controlling memory by triggering specific brain waves during sleep

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS researchers find that manipulating the pulses of electrical activity in the thalamus during non-REM deep sleep make mice remember or forget

Protein mingling under blue light

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists developed a new faster and more efficient optogenetic tool to manipulate protein clusters under blue light.

Model for multivalley polaritons

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists model the formation of multivalleys in semiconductor microcavities, bringing new ideas to the emerging valleytronics field.

Mapping DROSHA's cleavage sites

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists develop a new method to understand what and where the DROSHA protein is cutting.

New protein regulated by cellular starvation

Researchers at the Center of Genomic Integrity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), have found out an unexpected role for a protein involved in the DNA repair mechanism. The protein SHPRH not only helps to fix mistakes generated...Show More Summary

DNA misspelling correction method is very accurate

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists prove that a gene editing techniqueused for substituting a single nucleotide in the genome is highly accurate.

Decorating single layer and bilayer graphene with useful chemical groups

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists develop a new platform to attach chemical groups on graphene lying on a silica/silicon substrate.

Decorating single layer and bilayer graphene with useful chemical groups

Researchers at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology disclosed a new method to add chemical groups on (that is, to "functionalize") single layer (SLG) and bilayer (BLG) graphene lying on silica/silicon. Show More Summary

Clarifying how lithium ions ferry around in rechargeable batteries

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists observe the real-time ultrafast bonding of lithium ions with the solvents, in the same process that happens during charging and discharging of lithium batteries, and conclude that a new theory is needed.

New portal to unveil the dark sector of the Universe

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists theorize a new portal to peek into the dark world.

First CRISPR single-nucleotide edited transgenic mice

(Institute for Basic Science) It is technically challenging to replace a single nucleotide with the current gene editing tool, CRISPR-Cas9. Scientists at the Center for Genome Engineering, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have used a variation of the popular gene editing technique CRISPR-Cas9 to produce mice with a single nucleotide difference.

The smallest Cas9 genetic scissors (so far)

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS scientists present the smallest member of the CRISPR-Cas9 family developed to date and show that it can fit inside adeno-associated viruses and mutate blindness-causing genes

Scientists present the smallest member of the CRISPR-Cas9 family developed to date

Scientists at the Center for Genome Engineering, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), in collaboration with KIM Eunji (ToolGen Inc.) and KIM Jeong Hun (Seoul National University) have engineered the smallest CRISPR-Cas9 to date,...Show More Summary

Genome surgery with CRISPR-Cas9 to prevent blindness

(Institute for Basic Science) IBS study proves that CRISPR-Cas9 can be delivered directly into the eye of living animals to treat age-related macular degeneration efficiently and safely.

How to roll a nanotube: Demystifying carbon nanotubes' structure control

Pioneering research published in Nature by Professor Feng Ding's team from the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), in collaboration with Professor Jin Zhang's team, at Peking University...Show More Summary

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