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VIMS contributes to 'King Tide' mapping project

(Virginia Institute of Marine Science) 'Dress rehearsal' will help quantify local flooding risk and validate storm-surge models, while laying groundwork for a long-term network of volunteer data collectors.

Arctic sea ice once again shows considerable melting

(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) This September, the extent of Arctic sea ice shrank to roughly 4.7 million square kilometres, as was determined by researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute, the University of Bremen and Universität Hamburg.

An advanced autonomous platform for securing marine infrastructures

(IMDEA Networks Institute) Researchers at IMDEA Networks are working on a ?340.000 project called ThreatDetect, funded by the NATO Science for Peace and Security (SPS) Programme. The project aims at building an autonomous platform for securing marine infrastructures from external threats, such as intruding divers.

Aerial drones deliver sweet spot for HAB research at VIMS

(Virginia Institute of Marine Science) Aerial drones provide 'eyes in the sky' to guide collection of water samples within algal blooms with much greater efficiency and lower cost.

AWI's underwater robot Tramper successfully recovered

On 27 August 2017, deep-sea researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) recovered the underwater robot Tramper, which had been taking measurements at a depth of 2435 metres for nearly 60 weeks - the first long-term mission involving a crawler under the Arctic sea ice. Show More Summary

AWI's underwater robot Tramper successfully recovered

(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) On August 27, 2017, deep-sea recovered the underwater robot Tramper, which had been taking measurements at a depth of 2435 metres for nearly 60 weeks -- the first long-term mission involving a crawler under the Arctic sea ice. Show More Summary

New findings on the past and future of sea ice cover in the Arctic

(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) Temperatures in the Arctic are currently climbing two to three times faster than the global average. The result is dwindling sea ice. In a study published inShow More Summary

High altitude research aircraft explores the upper levels of the Asian Monsoon

(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) The Asian Monsoon System is one of the Earth's largest and most energetic weather systems, and monsoon rainfall is critical to feeding over a billion people in Asia. Show More Summary

Federal grant to help research project on coastal flooding

The Virginia Institute of Marine Science is being awarded nearly $835,000 in federal funds for a project intended to help coastal Virginia communities reduce the impacts of flooding. The Daily … Click to Continue »

Parasite revealed: New insights into dicyemida

(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Researchers decisively classify marine parasite Dicyemida, yielding new opportunities for understanding parasites and evolution.

First Floating Mega Island Tested

MARIN (Maritime Research Institute) tested an innovative concept for a floating mega island. The island comprises 87 large floating triangles that are flexibility connected to one another. Together they form a flexible floating island that can be as large as 1 to 5 km in cross-section.

Symbiotic ciliates and bacteria have a common ancestor

Ciliates, just like humans, are colonized by a vast diversity of bacteria. Some ciliates and their bacterial symbionts have become friends for life, as researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen demonstrated...Show More Summary

Time to rise and shine

(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) The copepod species Calanus finmarchicus schedules its day using a genetic clock that works independently of external stimuli. The clock shapes the copepod's metabolic rhythms and daily vertical migration. Show More Summary

New research reveals impact of seismic surveys on zooplankton

(University of Tasmania - Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies) Marine seismic surveys used in petroleum exploration could cause a two to three-fold increase in mortality of adult and larval zooplankton, new research published in leading science journal Nature Ecology and Evolution has found. Show More Summary

Lessons from whale population collapse could help future species at risk

(University of Tasmania - Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies) A study of historic whaling records has revealed there were warning signs that populations of commercially harvested whales were heading for global collapse up toShow More Summary

How the climate can rapidly change at tipping points

(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) During the last glacial period, within only a few decades the influence of atmospheric CO2 on the North Atlantic circulation resulted in temperature increases...Show More Summary

UV-sensing protein in the brain of a marine annelid zooplankton

Researchers at Institute for Molecular Sciences reported that a photoreceptive protein expressed in the brain a marine annelid zooplankton (Platynereis dumerilii) is UV-sensitive. This work was carried out as a collaborative work of Drs. Show More Summary

Mussels and sponges in the deep sea can thrive on oil with the help of symbiont bacteria

At asphalt volcanoes in the Gulf of Mexico that spew oil, gas and tar, mussels and sponges live in symbiosis with bacteria providing them with food. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology and colleagues from...Show More Summary

An orphan problem looking for adoption: responding to ocean acidification utilising existing international institutions

Ocean acidification poses a substantial threat to the ocean, marine wildlife and the goods and services they provide. As a result it presents a substantial regulatory challenge at the international, regional, national and sub-national levels. Show More Summary

Hawai'i researchers receive funds to forecast coral disease across Pacific Ocean

(University of Hawaii at Manoa) Researchers at University of Hawai'i at Manoa's Hawai'i Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB) were recently awarded a $1.026 million grant from NASA to develop coral disease forecasting models for Hawai'i, US-affiliated Pacific Islands, and the Great Barrier Reef.

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