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Find Out the New Scientific Way to Tell If You’re Having a Girl or Boy without an Ultrasound

Here is a brand new way of finding out if you’re having a girl or boy without getting an ultrasound or amniocenteses, and before waiting until around 16 to 20 weeks. A recently released study by the Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center discovered that the immune samples of women... Read More »

International Team Establishes First Diagnostic Criteria for Idiopathic Multicentric Castleman Disease

More than six decades after Castleman disease (CD) was first described, a group of experts from Penn Medicine and other institutions around the world has established the first set of diagnostic criteria for a life-threatening subtype of the condition, idiopathic multicentric CD (iMCD), which is often misdiagnosed as other illnesses.

Team establishes first diagnostic criteria for idiopathic multicentric castleman disease

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) More than six decades after Castleman disease (CD) was first described, a group of experts from Penn Medicine and other institutions around the world has established the first set of diagnostic...Show More Summary

The Flu Gets Cold

In an effort to one day eliminate the need for an annual flu shot, a group of researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai are exploring the surface of influenza viruses, which are covered by a protein called "hemagglutinin" (HA). Show More Summary

Poorly tuned neuronal communication may underlie neurological and psychiatric disease

(JCI Journals) In this issue of the JCI, Nils Brose and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine have identified a mutation in a synaptic protein called UNC13 in a patient diagnosed with ASD, hyperactivity, and dyskinesia. Further investigation revealed that the UNC13 mutation disturbs the fine-tuning of neuronal communication at the level of the synapse.

Scientists isolate new antibodies to fight human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

(VIB (the Flanders Institute for Biotechnology)) Researchers from VIB, UGent, the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and several collaborators developed a new antiviral strategy to fight human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children. Show More Summary

Gene Variant Identified for Kawasaki Disease Susceptibility

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine and in London and Singapore, have conducted novel whole genome sequencing of a family in which two of four children were affected by Kawasaki disease. Show More Summary

Neural network learns to select potential anticancer drugs

(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Scientists from Mail.Ru Group, Insilico Medicine and MIPT for the first time have applied a generative neural network to create new pharmaceutical medicines with the desired characteristics. Show More Summary

Cancer drug prices must come down, say leading research institutes

Top UK and US scientists say high cost for medicines is indefensible as they propose cheaper way to develop them The high price of new cancer drugs is indefensible and unsustainable, say two of the world’s leading cancer research institutions, who propose a different way to develop them that could sideline big pharma. Show More Summary

Gene variant identified for Kawasaki disease susceptibility

(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine and in London and Singapore, have conducted novel whole genome sequencing of a family in which two of four children were affected by Kawasaki disease. Show More Summary

UChicago Receives $2.4 Million NIH Grant to Build Visual Prosthesis

The University of Chicago Medicine has been awarded a $2.4 million, five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a system of wireless brain implants that might restore partial vision to people who have lost their sight.

Innovative procedure to measure cell energy production developed

Collaborative work between researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in development of a new software tool that enhances measurement and analysis of energy production generated by human immune cells.

UChicago receives $2.4 million NIH grant to build visual prosthesis

(University of Chicago Medical Center) The University of Chicago Medicine has been awarded a $2.4 million, five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a system of wireless brain implants that might restore partial vision to people who have lost their sight.

Findings: Induced pluripotent stem cells don't increase genetic mutations

(NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute) Despite immense promise, adoption of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in biomedical research and medicine has been slowed by concerns that these cells are prone to increased numbers of genetic mutations. Show More Summary

ACS will recruit 750 hospitals for program to lower costs and improve safety for patients

(American College of Surgeons) In collaboration with the Johns Hopkins Medicine Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality, the American College of Surgeons has launched a new multi-million dollar surgical quality improvement initiative funded and guided by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

Feil family donates $12.5 million to Weill Cornell Medicine

Weill Cornell Medicine has received a $12.5 million gift from the Feil family to build a 16,200-square-foot student center on the campus of its Upper East Side medical school, the institution will... To view the full story, click the title link.

Dying at home or in hospital dependent on wealth, location and number of diseases

(King's College London) In a new study, published today in BMC Medicine, researchers from King's College London's Cicely Saunders Institute studied a national data set of all deaths from two common groups of respiratory diseases -- chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial pulmonary diseases, covering 380,232 people over 14 years.

Drugs, Diseases and Proteins: New Archive Helps Precision Medicine, Drug Development

Tudor Oprea, MD, PhD, at UNM Comprehensive Cancer Center and his collaborators from the UK-based European Bioinformatics Institute in Hinxton and from the Institute for Cancer Research in London have created the beginnings of an open archive that links a drug's chemical structure, its molecular biology activity and the diseases it is used to treat.

NIH awards $21 million to research consortium to study epilepsy in patients with traumatic brain injuries

(Albert Einstein College of Medicine) An international consortium of academic research institutions have been awarded a $21 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop better ways to prevent epilepsy in patients who have suffered traumatic brain injuries.

Researchers identify drug that alleviates opioid withdrawal

(University of Calgary) Opioid use and abuse is a significant social, health and economic issue. Researchers at the University of Calgary's Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Hotchkiss Brain Institute have discovered that an existing anti-gout medication is effective in reducing the severity of withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent rodents. Show More Summary

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