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New Data Resource Centre Will Help Better Understand Links Between Birth Defects and Childhood Cancer

Up to $14.8 million over five years, contingent on available funds, was announced today by The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund's Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Research Program (Kids First). Researchers in Canada...Show More Summary

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia to Lead New Pediatric Data Resource Center for Research in Childhood Cancer and Structural Birth Defects

The Center for Data Driven Discovery in Biomedicine at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) will lead a new, collaborative effort funded by the National Institutes of Health Common Fund to discover the causes of pediatric cancer and structural birth defects through the use of big data. The Center will be known as the "Kids First Pediatric Data Resource Center" (DRC).

CHOP to lead new pediatric data resource center for research in childhood cancer, birth defects

(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) The Center for Data Driven Discovery in Biomedicine at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) will lead a new, collaborative effort funded by the National Institutes of Health Common Fund to discover the causes of pediatric cancer and structural birth defects through the use of big data. Show More Summary

NIH to host workshop on advances, future needs in human microbiome research

(NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute) Microbes inhabit just about every part of the human body outnumbering human cells by ten to one. The ten-year National Institutes of Health Common Fund Human Microbiome Project was established to understand how microbial communities impact human health. Show More Summary

NIH awards aim to understand molecular changes during physical activity

(NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases) The National Institutes of Health Common Fund announced today the first awards for the Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity in Humans Program, which will allow researchers to develop a comprehensive map of the molecular changes that occur in response to physical activity.

$2 Million in New Funding From Canadian Institutes of Health Research Will Help Ontario Team Study Metabolic Syndromes

The award will fund the study of the role of both genes and the environment on the development of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of medical conditions that are common in aging adults, including obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol, high blood sugar and insulin resistance.

$60 Million to Fund Study of Genetics Underlying Common Diseases

The McDonnell Genome Institute at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis will receive $60 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the genetics of common diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, stroke, autism and epilepsy.

Researchers Discover Three Glaucoma-Related Genes

An analysis funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, has identified three genes that contribute to the most common type of glaucoma. The study increases the total number of such genes to...

NIH researchers link single gene variation to obesity

A single variation in the gene for brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) may influence obesity in children and adults, according to a new study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The study suggests that a less common version of the BDNF gene may predispose people to obesity by producing lower levels of BDNF protein, a regulator of appetite, in the brain. read more

NIH Establishes 4D Nucleome Research Centers and Organizational Hub at UC San Diego

Under its new 4D Nucleome Program, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund has awarded three grants totaling more than $30 million over five years to multidisciplinary teams of researchers at University of California, San Diego.

Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism

Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches, researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have found. Heritability...Show More Summary

Too much protein may kill brain cells as Parkinson's progresses

Scientists may have discovered how the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease destroys brain cells and devastates many patients worldwide. The study was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS); the results may help scientists develop new therapies. read more

New data reveal extent of genetic overlap between major mental disorders

The largest genome-wide study of its kind has determined how much five major mental illnesses are traceable to the same common inherited genetic variations. Researchers funded in part by the National Institutes of Health found that the...Show More Summary

NIH-funded research provides new clues on how ApoE4 affects Alzheimer's risk

Common variants of the ApoE gene are strongly associated with the risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease, but the gene's role in the disease has been unclear. Now, researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have found that in mice, having the most risky variant of ApoE damages the blood vessels that feed the brain. read more

Bladder tests before urinary incontinence surgery in women may be unnecessary

An invasive and costly test commonly done in women before surgery for stress urinary incontinence may not be necessary, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The study compared results after both a pre-operative check-up in a doctor's office and bladder function tests to results after only the office check-up. Show More Summary

Clinical Trial to Use Drug to Boost Immune System Function in Critically Injured Children, May Prevent Infection

Thanks to funding from the National Institutes of Health, Nationwide Children's Hospital will test the ability of a drug commonly used to improve immune function in pediatric cancer patients to help prevent hospital-acquired infection after severe trauma. It will be the first clinical trial aimed at improving immune function in critically injured children.

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