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A stem's 'sense of self' contributes to shape

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) It is well known that as plants grow, their stems and shoots respond to outside signals like light and gravity. But if plants all have similar stimuli, why are there...Show More Summary

Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) The ability to deliver cargo like drugs or DNA into cells is essential for biological research and disease therapy but cell membranes are very good at defending their territory. Show More Summary

A perfect storm of fire and ice may have led to snowball Earth

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) What caused the largest glaciation event in Earth's history, known as 'snowball Earth'? Geologists and climate scientists have been searching for the answer for years but the root cause of the phenomenon remains elusive. Show More Summary

Portable nanofiber device offers precise, point-and-shoot capability

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard researchers have developed a lightweight, portable nanofiber fabrication device that could one day be used to dress wounds on a battlefield or dress shoppers in customizable fabrics.

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Origami-inspired materials use folds in materials to embed powerful functionality. However, all that folding can be pretty labor intensive. Now, researchers at the Harvard John A. Show More Summary

The ancient art of kirigami is inspiring a new class of materials

Origami-inspired materials use folds in materials to embed powerful functionality. However, all that folding can be pretty labor intensive. Now, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are drawing material inspiration from another ancient Japanese paper craft—kirigami.

All The Money In The World Couldn’t Endear John Paulson To NYU Students

John Paulson's support for Trump incites biggest blowback yet: some angry undergrads.

You Can Take The AIG Out Of Paulson & Co., But You Can’t Take John Paulson Out Of AIG

Dumping stock in a company whose board you currently sit on is, among other things, an extremely Paulson move.

Breakthrough in Grid Energy Storage

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new flow battery that stores energy in organic molecules dissolved in neutral pH water. This new chemistry allows for a non-toxic, non-corrosive battery with an exceptionally long lifetime and offers the potential to significantly decrease the costs of production.

New, long-lasting flow battery could run for more than a decade with minimum upkeep

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard researchers have developed a new flow battery that stores energy in organic molecules dissolved in neutral pH water. This new chemistry allows for a non-toxic, non-corrosive battery with an exceptionally long lifetime and offers the potential to significantly decrease the costs of production.

Flat lens opens a broad world of color

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) SEAS researchers have developed the first flat lens that works within a continual bandwidth of colors, from blue to green. This bandwidth, close to that of an LED, paves the way for new applications in imaging, spectroscopy and sensing.

Flat lens to work across a continuous bandwidth allows new control of light

Last summer, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) announced a new, flat lens that could focus light with high efficiency within the visible spectrum. The lens used an ultrathin array of nanopillars to bend and focus light as it passed.

Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Inspired by natural cellular structures, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the Wyss Institute for BiologicallyShow More Summary

Bursts of methane may have warmed early Mars

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) The presence of water on ancient Mars is a paradox. There's plenty of geographical evidence that rivers periodically flowed across the planet's surface yet Mars should have been too cold to support liquid water at that time. Show More Summary

Soft robot helps the heart beat

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard University and Boston Children's Hospital researchers have developed a customizable soft robot that fits around a heart and helps it beat, potentially opening new treatment options for people suffering from heart failure.

Multiregional brain on a chip

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard University researchers have developed a multiregional brain-on-a-chip that models the connectivity between three distinct regions of the brain. The in vitro...Show More Summary

The false choice of basic vs. applied research

A new call to abolish the concept of "applied research" comes from a surprising source: the founding dean of Harvard's John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).

Mimicking biological movements with soft robots

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Designing a soft robot to move organically -- to bend like a finger or twist like a wrist -- has always been a process of trial and error. Now, Harvard researchers have developed a method to automatically design soft actuators based on the desired movement.

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