Trend Results : John Paulson


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Using optical chaos to control the momentum of light

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Controlling and moving light poses serious challenges. One major hurdle is that light travels at different speeds and in different phases in different components of an integrated circuit. Show More Summary

Making big data a little smaller

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard computer scientist found that the Johnson-Lindenstrauss lemma, a 30-year-old therum, is the best approach to pre-process large data into a manageably low dimension for algorithmic processing.

Bridging the terahertz gap

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard researchers are exploring the possibility of using an infrared frequency comb to generate elusive terahertz frequencies. These frequencies -- which lie in the...Show More Summary

Shaping animal, vegetable and mineral

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Harvard researchers demonstrate a technique to grow any target shape from any starting shape.

A zero-index waveguide: Researchers directly observe infinitely long wavelengths for the first time

In 2015, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) developed the first on-chip metamaterial with a refractive index of zero, meaning that the phase of light could be stretched infinitely long. Show More Summary

A zero-index waveguide

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) In 2015, Harvard researchers developed the first on-chip metamaterial with a refractive index of zero, meaning that the phase of light could be stretched infinitely long. Show More Summary

Research rethinks the evolutionary importance of variability in a population

It's been long thought that variability within a population is key to population's growth and survival but new research questions that assumption. Ariel Amir, Assistant Professor in Applied Mathematics at the Harvard John A. PaulsonShow More Summary

Research rethinks the evolutionary importance of variability in a population

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) It's been long thought that variability within a population is key to population's growth and survival but new research questions that assumption. Harvard researchers found that variability can actually lower population growth in single-cell organisms. Show More Summary

John Paulson Finds Scapegoats For Gold Losses

It was those greedy bastard gold-miner CEOs this whole time! And they’re not gonna get away with it.

Imagining a world without species

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Categorizing species can get hazy at small, microbial scales. After all, the classical definition of species as interbreeding individuals with sexually viable offspring doesn't apply to asexual organisms. Show More Summary

Mimicking birdsongs

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a simple device that mimics complex birdsongs. The device uses air blown through a stretched rubber tube to recreate birdsongs found in nature, including the songs of zebra and Bengalese finches.

Researchers develop simple device to recreate complex birdsongs

Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a simple device that mimics complex birdsongs. The device, developed by the group of L. Mahadevan, the Lola England de Valpine Professor...Show More Summary

Harvard researchers just developed self-healing rubber

You’ve heard of self-healing concrete and even the potential of a self-healing starship, but what about rubber that repairs itself? The invention now exists, thanks to researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). Show More Summary

Harvard researchers develop tough, self-healing rubber

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Imagine a tire that could heal after being punctured or a rubber band that never snapped. Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new type of rubber that is as tough as natural rubber but can also self-heal.

How future volcanic eruptions will impact Earth's ozone layer

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) The next major volcanic eruption could kick-start chemical reactions that would seriously damage the planet's already besieged ozone layer. The extent of damage toShow More Summary

Smaller, smarter, softer robotic arm for endoscopic surgery

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Researchers from Harvard University have developed a hybrid rigid-soft robotic arm for endoscopes with integrated sensing, flexibility, and multiple degrees of freedom. Show More Summary

Safely releasing genetically modified genes into the wild

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) So, you've genetically engineered a malaria-resistant mosquito, now what? How many mosquitos would you need to replace the disease-carrying wild type? What is the most...Show More Summary

John Paulson Can Lose Money Just Fine On His Own, Thank You Very Much

Guy Levy’s negative-return services are no longer required at Paulson & Co.

Paulson Shutters Long-Short Equity Fund Amid Massive Healthcare Losses

After gaining instant fame with his massive subprime bet back in 2008/2009, John Paulson can't seem to buy a clue of late. Over the past couple of years, a series of strategic missteps have resulted in abysmal returns and increasingShow More Summary

How bacteria maintain and recover their shape

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Bacteria have an extraordinary ability to maintain and recover their morphology even after being twisted out of shape. Researchers know that shape is determined by the cell wall, yet little is known about how bacteria monitor and control it. Show More Summary

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