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A neighborhood's quality influences children's behaviors through teens, study suggests

The quality of the neighborhood where a child grows up has a significant impact on the number of problem behaviors they display during elementary and teenage years, a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests.

A neighborhood's quality influences children's behaviors through teens, study suggests

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) The quality of the neighborhood where a child grows up has a significant impact on the number of problem behaviors they display during elementary and teenage years, a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests. 

Breast cancer patients forego post-surgery treatment due to mistrust, study suggests

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Nearly one-third of women with breast cancer went against their doctor's advice and chose not to begin or complete the recommended adjuvant anti-cancer therapy to kill residual tumor cells following surgery, according to a study led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researcher.

Former President Bill Clinton to speak at opioid summit

Former President Bill Clinton will attend an opioid summit next week at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Clinton is scheduled to speak Monday at the school in … Click to Continue »

The Next Pandemic

With Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the National Museum of Natural History, we look at the past, present and future of the flu

Blood-Based Epigenetic Research May Hold Clues to Autism Biology, Study Suggests

Using data from blood and brain tissue, a team led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that they could gain insights into mechanisms that might help explain autism by analyzing the interplay between genes and chemical tags that control whether genes are used to make a protein, called epigenetic marks.

Risk for Developing HPV-Related Throat Cancer Low

A new study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers shows that the risk of developing HPV-related throat cancer remains generally low.

Letter to the Editor: California’s response on challenge of SB27

Editor’s note: California State Veterinarian Annette Jones submitted this letter in response to a letter posted from a group of faculty and staff from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future at the Bloomberg School of Public Health regarding California legislation about antibiotic use in animals used for human food. The letter from the Johns Hopkins... Continue Reading

Risk for developing HPV-related throat cancer low

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers shows that the risk of developing HPV-related throat cancer remains generally low.

Letter to the Editor: CA needs to close antibiotic loopholes

Editor’s note: A group of faculty and staff from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future at the Bloomberg School of Public Health sent the below letter to several California officials this past week. It is reprinted here with the permission of the authors.  To: Dr. Annette Jones, State Veterinarian and Director, Animal Health and Food... Continue Reading

Gaps Persist in Zambia's Food Fortification System, Study Suggests

A study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that most fortified sugar sold at retail outlets in one Zambian community did not contain the minimum amount of vitamin A required by the government. Only 11 percent of sugar tested met the required minimum concentration of vitamin A.

State laws requiring autism coverage by private insurers led to increases in autism care

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found that the enactment of state laws mandating coverage of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was followed by sizable increases in insurer-covered ASD care and associated spending.

State Laws Requiring Autism Coverage by Private Insurers Led to Increases in Autism Care

A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found that the enactment of state laws mandating coverage of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was followed by sizeable increases in insurer-covered ASD care and associated spending.

Safe motherhood campaign associated with more prenatal visits, birth planning, study finds

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) In Tanzania, pregnant women who were exposed to a national safe motherhood campaign designed to get them to visit health facilities for prenatal care and delivery were more likely to create birth plans and to attend more prenatal appointments.

Promising Results for Two Genetic Weapons Against Malaria

Two new papers by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Malaria Research Institute report successes for highly promising strategies against malaria, a disease that still kills more than 400,000 people each year, mostly children age five and under in sub-Saharan Africa.

Promising results for 2 genetic weapons against malaria

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Antimalarial bacteria and immune-boosted mosquitoes show strong potential to spread in the wild.

Global Food Expert Martin Bloem to Lead the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future

Martin W. Bloem, MD, PhD, a leading expert in global food and nutrition research and policy, has been named director of the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Long-term opioid prescription use jumps threefold over 16-year period, study suggests

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that opioid prescription use increased significantly between 1999 and 2014, and that much of that increase stemmed from patients who'd been taking their medication for 90 days or longer.

Long-Term Opioid Prescription Use Jumps Threefold Over 16-Year Period, Large-Scale Study Suggests

A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that opioid prescription increased significantly between 1999 and 2014, and that much of that increase stemmed from patients who'd been taking their medication for 90 days or longer.

Assessment Tools, Relationships Key to Addressing Child Trauma

Two new studies led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggest that the bevy of tools available to assess and address childhood adversity and trauma, as well as the interconnected webs of relationships among families and the providers who care for children, are key to healing the effects of these potentially life-altering circumstances.

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