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North Korea May Soon Test Another Nuclear Weapon (The Only Question Is Where)

Dave Majumdar Security, Asia Like in the atmosphere.  North Korea continues to work on tunnels it used for nuclear test, despite recent tremors according to imagery analysis by the 38 North project at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. Show More Summary

Exposure to larger air particles linked to increased risk of asthma in children

(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University report statistical evidence that children exposed to airborne coarse particulate matter -- a mix of dust, sand and non-exhaust tailpipe emissions, such as tire rubber -- are more likely to develop asthma and need emergency room or hospital treatment for it than unexposed children.

Coalition seeks to increase transparency on life science career prospects

(Johns Hopkins University) Nine US research universities and a major cancer institute today announced plans to give would-be life scientists clear, standardized data on graduate school admissions, education and training opportunities, and career prospects.

Johns Hopkins Scientists Chart How Brain Signals Connect to Neurons

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have used supercomputers to create an atomic scale map that tracks how the signaling chemical glutamate binds to a neuron in the brain. The findings, say the scientists, shed light on the dynamic physics of the chemical's pathway, as well as the speed of nerve cell communications.

Liquid Biopsy Results Differed Substantially Between Two Providers

Two Johns Hopkins prostate cancer researchers found significant disparities when they submitted identical patient samples to two different commercial liquid biopsy providers. Liquid biopsy is a new and noninvasive alternative to tumor tissue sequencing, and it is intended to specifically detect and sequence tumor DNA circulating in patients' blood. Show More Summary

Warning Labels Can Help Reduce Soda Consumption and Obesity, New Study Suggests

Labels that warn people about the risks of drinking soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) can lower obesity and overweight prevalence, suggests a new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study.

Recordings reveal deep credibility gap when doctors and parents discuss outcomes for critically ill

(Johns Hopkins Medicine) An analysis of 16 audiotaped conversations between parents of infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and clinicians found that medical staff routinely downplay quality of life issues and leave families more optimistic about their babies' prognoses than the clinicians intended.

Bioethicists Call for Caution in Use of Rare Experimental Fetal Therapy

Citing uncertainties about the risks and benefits of an experimental therapy for fetuses whose kidneys do not develop, bioethicists at Johns Hopkins and a team of medical experts are calling for rigorous clinical trials in the use of a potential treatment, known as amnioinfusion.

Computer Simulation Aims to Understand Arrhythmia-Induced Sudden Cardiac Death

Sudden cardiac death resulting from an arrhythmia is a rare and difficult to study disorder. Now researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a computer model of the heart specifically mimicking what happens to it prior to and during sudden cardiac death. The biomolecular simulation is already pointing to drug targets that should be looked […]

Common fungus helps dengue virus thrive in mosquitoes

A species of fungus that lives in the gut of some Aedes aegypti mosquitoes increases the ability of dengue virus to survive in the insects, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The fungus exerts this effect by reducing the production and activity of digestive enzymes in the mosquitoes.

Common fungus helps dengue virus thrive in mosquitoes

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A species of fungus that lives in the gut of some Aedes aegypti mosquitoes increases the ability of dengue virus to survive in the insects, according to a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Children on sex offender registries at greater risk for suicide attempts, study suggests

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that children who were legally required to register as sex offenders were at greater...Show More Summary

Children on Sex Offender Registries at Greater Risk for Suicide Attempts, Study Suggests

A new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that children who were legally required to register as sex offenders were at greater risk for harm, including suicide attempts and sexual assault, compared to a group of children who engaged in harmful or illegal sexual behavior but who were not required to register.

Recently discovered fossil shows transition of a reptile from life on land to life in the sea

(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Using modern research tools on a 155-million-year-old reptile fossil, scientists at Johns Hopkins and the American Museum of Natural History report they have filled in some important clues to the evolution of animals that once roamed land and transitioned to life in the water.

Combination Strategy Could Hold Promise for Ovarian Cancer

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers demonstrated that mice with ovarian cancer that received drugs to reactivate dormant genes along with other drugs that activate the immune system had a greater reduction of tumor burden and significantly longer survival than those that received any of the drugs alone.

Johns Hopkins’ Kyle Otazu Tops D3 Rankings in 500 At ‘Big Al’ Open

By Spencer Penland on SwimSwam Kyle Otazu hit a #1 D3 ranking in the 500, while Princeton swept their own invite. Read the full story on SwimSwam: Johns Hopkins’ Kyle Otazu Tops D3 Rankings in 500 At ‘Big Al’ Open

Opioid Crisis: Criminal Justice Referrals Miss Treatment Opportunities, Study Suggests

A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that under 5 percent of those referred for opioid treatment from the criminal justice system were directed to medication-assisted programs to treat their disorder.

Opioid crisis: Criminal justice referrals miss treatment opportunities, study suggests

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that under 5 percent of those referred for opioid treatment from the criminal justice system were directed to medication-assisted programs to treat their disorder

Physicians' experiences with family and friends impact breast cancer screening

(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Results of a national survey of more than 800 physicians suggest that their experiences with patients, family members and friends with breast cancer are linked with their recommendations for routine mammogra...

Scientists propose efficiency 'rules' for enhancing use of new gene editing technology

Johns Hopkins scientists have developed a streamlined method and accompanying efficiency "rules" for introducing new DNA sequences into cells after using the gene-cutting tool known as CRISPR. The scientists say the method, which they based on tests with mouse embryos and thousands of human cells, could improve consistency and efficiency of genome editing.

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