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Pennsylvania Takes on Medical Errors, the Third-Leading Cause of U.S. Deaths

Written by Trent Smith, communications professional focusing on government A May 2016 Johns Hopkins study indicates that 10 percent of all U.S. deaths are due to medical error, making it the third leading cause of death, behind onlyShow More Summary

Fungus Makes Mosquitoes Much More Likely to Become Infected with Malaria

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have identified a fungus that compromises the immune system of mosquitoes, making them more susceptible to infection with the parasite that causes malaria. Because environmental...Show More Summary

Overly Concerned About Privacy? Allo Isn’t for You

With figures like Edward Snowden and Johns Hopkins’s Matthew Green taking to Twitter this morning, many should be questioning whether Allo is the right messaging service for them. When unveiled at Google I/O earlier this year, Google...Show More Summary

NASA Astronomers Observe a Supermassive Black Hole Destroying a Star

"The black hole has destroyed everything between itself and this dust shell," said Sjoert van Velzen, at Johns Hopkins University. "It's as though the black hole has cleaned its room by throwing flames." Supermassive black holes, with their immense gravitational...

A Sex Hormone In Birth Control May Protect Women From The Flu

Researchers from Johns Hopkins believe the hormone could offer "a viable flu treatment for women,” who are often hit hardest by the virus.

New Evidence That Testosterone May Explain Sex Difference in Knee Injury Rates

In studies on rats, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report new evidence that the predominance of the hormone testosterone in males may explain why women are up to 10 times more likely than men to injure the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knees.

Johns Hopkins University and Michael R. Bloomberg Launch the Bloomberg American Health Initiative

The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health today announced that Bloomberg Philanthropies, founded by businessman and philanthropist Michael R. Bloomberg, will give $300 million to create the Bloomberg American Health Initiative to transform the national approach to modern public health challenges

Female Sex Hormone May Protect Women From Worst Effects of the Flu

In mouse studies, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have found that progesterone - a female sex hormone contained in most forms of hormone-based birth control - appears to stave off the worst effects of influenza infection and, in an unexpected finding, help damaged lung cells to heal more quickly.

For-profit trade schools prove costly for disadvantaged black youth

Young African-Americans from some of the country's most disadvantaged neighborhoods are drawn to for-profit post-secondary trade schools, believing they are the quickest route to jobs. But a new study co-authored by a Johns Hopkins University...Show More Summary

100 objects that shaped public health

last weekHumor / odd : Kottke.org

From the School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins comes this list of 100 things that have “made their mark on public health”, good and bad. Here’s a sampling of the objects: Horseshoe crab. We all owe a debt of gratitude to the helmet-shaped horseshoe crab, whose ancestors date back 450 million years. Show More Summary

Computer Algorithm Illuminates Need of High-Volume Hospitals and Standard Care for Transplant Patients

Using the results from a computerized mathematical model, Johns Hopkins researchers investigated whether they could improve heart and lung transplantation procedures by transferring patients from low-volume to high-volume transplant centers.

Computer algorithm shows need of standard care for transplant patients

Using the results from a computerized mathematical model, Johns Hopkins researchers investigated whether they could improve heart and lung transplantation procedures by transferring patients from low-volume to high-volume transplant centers. read more

Termination of lethal arrhythmia with light

A research team from the University of Bonn has succeeded for the first time in using light stimuli to stop life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia in mouse hearts. Furthermore, as shown in computer simulations at Johns Hopkins University, this technique could also be used successfully for human hearts. Show More Summary

Light tames lethal heart disorders in mice and virtual humans

(Johns Hopkins University) Using high-tech human heart models and mouse experiments, scientists at Johns Hopkins and Germany's University of Bonn have shown that beams of light could replace electric shocks in patients reeling from a deadly heart rhythm disorder.

New studies double number of known sites in genome linked to high blood pressure

(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Several large international groups of researchers report data that more than doubles the number of sites in the human genome tied to blood pressure regulation. One of the studies, by Johns Hopkins UniversityShow More Summary

New Studies Double Number of Known Sites in Genome Linked to High Blood Pressure

Several large international groups of researchers report data that more than doubles the number of sites in the human genome tied to blood pressure regulation. One of the studies, by Johns Hopkins University scientists in collaboration...Show More Summary

Kill them with cuteness: The adorable thing bats do to catch prey

A Johns Hopkins University researcher noticed the bats he works with cocked their heads to the side, just like his pet Pug. "It's an adorable behavior, and I was curious about the purpose," said Melville J. Wohlgemuth, a postdoctoral fellow in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences' Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Show More Summary

Kill them with cuteness: The adorable thing bats do to catch prey

(PLOS) A Johns Hopkins University researcher noticed the bats he works with cocked their heads to the side, just like his pet pug. As the article publishing in open-access journal PLOS Biology details, using high-tech recording devices,...Show More Summary

Kill them with cuteness: The adorable thing bats do to catch prey

A Johns Hopkins University researcher noticed the bats he works with cocked their heads to the side, just like his pet Pug.

Sugar transforms a traditional Chinese medicine into a cruise missile

(Johns Hopkins Medicine) A chemical biologist and his colleagues at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine report that tests of triptolide in human cells and mice are vastly improved by the chemical attachment of glucose to the triptolide molecule.

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