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Safe Space for Illegal Drug Consumption in Baltimore Would Save $6 Million a Year

A new cost-benefit analysis conducted by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and others suggests that $6 million in costs related to the opioid epidemic could be saved each year if a single "safe consumption" space for illicit drug users were opened in Baltimore.

Safe space for illegal drug consumption in Baltimore would save $6 million a year

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) A new cost-benefit analysis conducted by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and others suggests that $6 million in costs related to the opioid epidemic could be saved each year if a single 'safe consumption' space for illicit drug users were opened in Baltimore.

Past and future of data analysis

Roger Peng, a biostatistics professor at John Hopkins University, talks about the past and future of data analysis, using music as a metaphor for the path.… Tags: data analysis, Roger Peng

Trump’s Big Problems: Anemic Private Investment and Weak Productivity

Authored by Steve H. Hanke of the Johns Hopkins University. Follow him on Twitter @Steve_Hanke. Why was the Great Depression so deep, and why did it drag on for so long? According to impressive research by Robert Higgs of the Independent...Show More Summary

How to protect yourself against vision loss, a growing problem

Ask Americans to name the ailment they fear most, and blindness ranks at the top, along with Alzheimer's and cancer, according to a recent survey by the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins University. And yet each year, 50,000 Americans go blind, nearly half from eye diseases that are treatable...

Media Advisory: Experts Available to Discuss Historic Cancer Drug Approval

Today, for the first time, a drug has been FDA-approved for cancer based on disease genetics rather than type. Developed from 30 years of basic research at Johns Hopkins and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute, pembroluzimab now can be used for colon, pancreatic, stomach, ovarian and other cancers if genetic testing reveals defects in so-called mismatch repair genes.

In Emerging Markets, It's Time To Dump Most Central Banks, And Their Currencies Too

Authored by Steve H. Hanke of the Johns Hopkins University. Follow him on Twitter @Steve_Hanke. On March 16th, the New York Times carried reportage by Peter S. Goodman, Keith Bradsher and Neil Gough, which was titled “The Fed Acts. Workers in Mexico and Merchants in Malaysia Suffer.” The theme of their extensive reportage is that U.S. Show More Summary

Johns Hopkins Study Shows One of the Deadliest Hospital-Acquired Infections Is Preventable

In a recent paper published online in the journal Critical Care Medicine, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute of Patient Safety and Quality led a study that demonstrated that health care providers can take steps to curb ventilator-associated events.

How the Injured Brain Tells the Body It's Hurt

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a new way that cells in the brain alert the rest of the body to recruit immune cells when the brain is injured. The work was completed in mouse models that mimic infection, stroke or trauma in humans.

Revamp health regulations to reduce cost and improve patient safety

Johns Hopkins ophthalmologist Oliver Schein has found a simple way to save a half a billion dollars a year from our country’s health care bill, with no negative effect on patient health. The only thing standing in the way is a stubborn government requirement. Seventeen years ago, Dr. Schein and colleagues published a study finding […]

Path to End HIV Could Be Within Reach for United States in Next Decade

The United States could be on track within the next decade to see significant steps towards ending the HIV epidemic in this country, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital.

Path to end HIV could be within reach for United States in next decade

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) The United States could be on track within the next decade to see significant steps towards ending the HIV epidemic in this country, suggests new research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital.

Making drug use a crime makes HIV prevention, treatment more difficult

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) The criminalization of drug use has a negative effect on efforts to prevent and treat people with HIV, suggests a review of published research conducted by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of British Columbia.

Making Drug Use a Crime Makes HIV Prevention, Treatment More Difficult

The criminalization of drug use has a negative effect on efforts to prevent the spread of HIV and to treat people with the infection, suggests a review of published research conducted by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of British Columbia.

Wasted Food Means Wasted Nutrients

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for a Livable Future calculated the nutritional value of food wasted in the U.S. at the retail and consumer levels, shining a light on just how much protein, fiber and other important nutrients end up in the landfill in a single year.

A path toward ending AIDS in the US by 2025

(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Using prevention surveillance data to model rates of HIV incidence, prevalence and mortality, investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health set targets,...Show More Summary

Wasted food means wasted nutrients

(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for a Livable Future calculated the nutritional value of food wasted in the US at the retail and consumer levels, shining a light on just how much protein, fiber and other important nutrients end up in the landfill in a single year.

NCAA lacrosse tournament 2017 results: Duke highlights Day 1 upsets

The 2017 NCAA lacrosse tournament started on Saturday with a pair of upsets, including Duke getting a rare road win at Johns Hopkins in the first round. Duke beat the No. 6 seed on the road, 19-6, snapping a long home tournament winning...Show More Summary

Gene sequencing study reveals unusual mutations in endometriosis

(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Using gene sequencing tools, scientists from Johns Hopkins Medicine and the University of British Columbia have found a set of genetic mutations in samples from 24 women with benign endometriosis, a painful disorder marked by the growth of uterine tissue outside of the womb. Show More Summary

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