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Man Convicted In Hasidic Brooklyn Mob Attack Is A Scapegoat For Shomrim, Lawyer Says

The only man tried in the 2013 beating of a fashion student by a mob of Hasidic Jewish vigilantes is appealing his conviction, arguing that prosecutors relied on junk science to tie his DNA to the scene. The prosecution, his lawyer argues,...Show More Summary

More on Junk DNA

Junk DNA, put simply, is those parts of the genome (human or otherwise) that have no known function. The human genome has about 19,000 genes. A gene is essentially a sequence of base pairs that code for a protein – there are four difference bases with each triplet being a “word” that either codes for […]

At least 75 per cent of our DNA really is useless junk after all

After decades of arguing whether junk DNA exists, a study has calculated that without it we’d all have to reproduce in huge numbers to escape harmful mutations

A chicken-egg question: Where do baby genes come from?

(University of Arizona) New genes are more likely to emerge full-fledged from a genome's 'junk' DNA than many scientists would have expected, according to new research by UA evolutionary biologists.

Plant genes may lack off switch, but have volume control

Scientists at the University of California, Davis have discovered that DNA sequences thought to be essential for gene activity can be expendable. Sequences once called junk sometimes call the shots instead.

Non-coding RNA: More uses for genomic junk

5 months agoAcademics : Nature

It emerges that nascent non-coding RNAs transcribed from regulatory DNA sequences called enhancers bind to the enzyme CBP to promote its activity locally. In turn, the activities of CBP stimulate further enhancer transcription.

Little green prescriptivists

Today's SMBC starts with this panel: And ends with this one: The aftercomic: My preferred imaginary event proving evolution false would be the discovery that highly-conserved junk DNA encodes versions of the Book of Genesis in Hebrew. Much more interesting than sauropods with nylon stretchpants — especially the variorum edition.

The dark side of 'junk' DNA

Certain short, repetitive sequences of DNA, or “junk,” play an important role in the development of Ewing sarcoma, new research indicates.

The dark side of 'junk' DNA

(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) Researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center report in the journal Cell Reports that certain short, repetitive sequences of DNA, or 'junk,' play an important role in the development of Ewing sarcoma, a rare bone and soft tissue cancer that occurs most commonly in children and adolescents.

The Dark Side of 'Junk' DNA

Researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center report in the journal Cell Reports that certain short, repetitive sequences of DNA, or "junk," play an important role in the development of Ewing sarcoma.

For normal heart function, look beyond the genes

Researchers have shown that when parts of a genome known as enhancers are missing, the heart works abnormally, a finding that bolsters the importance of DNA segments once considered "junk" because they do not code for specific prote...

Linking RNA structure and function

Several years ago, biologists discovered a new type of genetic material known as long noncoding RNA. This RNA does not code for proteins and is copied from sections of the genome once believed to be "junk DNA."

Variation in 'junk' DNA leads to trouble

Although genetic variants are scattered throughout the human genome, scientists have largely ignored the stretches of repetitive genetic code known as 'junk' DNA in their search for differences that influence human health and disease. Show More Summary

Reading between the genes

For a long time dismissed as 'junk DNA,' we now know that also the regions between the genes fulfill vital functions. Scientists have now developed a method to find regulatory DNA regions which are active and controlling genes.

Shedding light on the 'dark matter' of the genome

What used to be dismissed by many as 'junk DNA' is back with a vengeance as growing data points to the importance of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) -- genome's messages that do not code for proteins -- in development and disease. Researchers have developed a method that enables scientists to explore in depth what ncRNAs do in human cells.

Key gene in development of celiac disease has been found in 'junk' DNA

40% of the population carry the main risk factor for celiac disease but only 1% develop the disease. A newly found gene that influences its development has been found in what until recently has been known as ‘junkDNA. Celiac disease...Show More Summary

A key gene in the development of celiac disease has been found in 'junk' DNA

Coeliac disease is a chronic, immunological disease that is manifested as intolerance to gluten proteins present in wheat, rye and barley. This intolerance leads to an inflammatory reaction in the small intestine that hampers the absorption of nutrients. The only treatment is a strict, life-long, gluten-free diet. read more

'Junk' DNA plays role in preventing breast cancer

Supposed 'junk' DNA, found in between genes, plays a role in suppressing cancer, according to new research. The human genome contains around three meters of DNA, of which only about two per cent contains genes that code for proteins. Since the sequencing of the complete human genome in 2000, scientists have puzzled over the role of the remaining 98 per cent.

'Junk' DNA plays role in preventing breast cancer

Supposed "junk" DNA, found in between genes, plays a role in suppressing cancer, according to new research by Universities of Bath and Cambridge. The human genome contains around three metres of DNA, of which only about two per cent contains genes that code for proteins. Show More Summary

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