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Even small black holes emit gravitational waves when they collide, and LIGO heard them

LIGO scientists say they have discovered gravitational waves coming from another black hole merger, and it's the tiniest one they've ever seen.

The LIGO Spacetime Event --"First Giant Galaxy We Observed had a New Source of Light Popping Right Out at Us" (WATCH Video)

"We've shown that the heaviest elements in the periodic table, whose origin was shrouded in mystery until today are made in the mergers of neutron stars,” said Edo Berger with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "Each merger can produce more...        

Physics Week in Review: November 18, 2017

There's been a flood of cool physics news heading into the Thanksgiving holiday. Some highlights: theory of dark matter disks is toast; LIGO detects yet another binary black hole merger; and the physics of whammy bar resonance. Snap, Crackle, Whop--Explore...

"Seeing Through the Big Bang Into Another Universe" --LIGO Gravitational Wave Discovery May Confirm an Outrageous 'New' Cosmology (WATCH Weekend 'Galaxy' Stream)

"Your theory is crazy, but it's not crazy enough to be true," said the great Danish physicist Niels Bohr. Enter Sir Roger Penrose. Correlated noise in the two LIGO gravitational-wave detectors may provide evidence that the universe is governed by...        

LIGO and Virgo announce the detection of a black hole binary merger from June 8, 2017

Scientists searching for gravitational waves have confirmed yet another detection from their fruitful observing run earlier this year. Dubbed GW170608, the latest discovery was produced by the merger of two relatively light black holes, 7 and 12 times the mass of the sun, at a distance of about a billion light-years from Earth. Show More Summary

Even small black holes emit gravitational waves when they collide, and LIGO heard them

LIGO scientists say they have discovered gravitational waves coming from another black hole merger, and it’s the tiniest one they’ve ever seen. The findings, submitted to the Astrophysical Journal Letters, could shed light on the diversity of the black hole population — and may help scientists...

"Attempt No Voyage Here!" Milky Way Harbors 100 Million Black Holes --'There are Tens of Millions of these Dark Enigmatic Objects Each the Size of 30 Suns' (Today's Most Popular)

"The weirdness of the LIGO discovery" --The detection of gravitational waves created by the merger of two 30-solar-mass black holes (image below) had astronomers asking just how common are black holes of this size, and how often do they merge?...        

Q&A with Nobel laureate Barry Barish

Barish explains how LIGO became the high-achieving experiment it is today.

The Most Amazing Supermassive Spacetime Event in the Cosmos --"Absolutely Dwarfs the Black Hole Mergers Detected by LIGO"

"The gravitational waves from these supermassive black hole binary mergers are the most powerful in the universe," says Chiara Mingarelli, a research fellow at the Center for Computational Astrophysics at the Flatiron Institute in New York City. "They absolutely dwarf...        

LIGO mirror coatings get upgrade

Stanford scientists will lead a new national cooperative effort, the LIGO Scientific Collaboration Center for Coatings Research, to improve detection of gravitational waves at the twin LIGO facilities.

Neutron star merger confirms decades of predictions

On Aug. 17, the Laser Interferometry Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected the fifth fingerprint of a massive disturbance in spacetime since LIGO began operations in September 2015. Unlike the first four sets of ripples, which reflected collisions between two black holes, the shape of these spacetime distortions suggested a collision between two neutron stars.

A gravitational-wave standard siren measurement of the Hubble constant

3 weeks agoAcademics : Nature

On 17 August 2017, the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors observed the gravitational-wave event GW170817—a strong signal from the merger of a binary neutron-star system. Less than two seconds after the merger, a ?-ray burst (GRB 170817A)...Show More Summary

What the Neutron Star Collision Means for Dark Matter

The latest LIGO observations rekindle a fiery debate over how gravity works: Does the universe include dark matter, or doesn’t it?

"Nixed!" --Neutron Star Mashup Spikes Theories That Gravitational Waves Travel Faster Than Speed of Light (VIDEO)

On October 16, physicists announced that the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, LIGO, and VIRGO, the European Gravitational Observatory, detected gravitational waves from a neutron star merger that emitted high-energy light shortly after merging (view the sequential videos below). The...        

The 5 biggest discoveries from the hunt for gravitational waves

Detecting gravitational waves has given us a new way to observe the universe by listening to ripples in space-time. Here are five of the biggest finds from LIGO

Let's Break Down What That Monumental Neutron Star Collision Actually Told Us

Astronomy has entered a new era, one where light and gravity both play a role in understanding the Universe's craziest phenomena. On August 17, 2017, over 70 observatories around (and above) the world, including ones like LIGO and the Hubble Space Telescope, all spotted a flash of energy. Show More Summary

Researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

Astrophysicist Chris Fryer was enjoying an evening with friends on August 25, 2017, when he got the news of a gravitational-wave detection by LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory. The event appeared to be a merger of two neutron stars—a specialty for the Los Alamos National Laboratory team of astrophysicists that Fryer leads. Show More Summary

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) Astrophysicist Chris Fryer was enjoying an evening with friends on Aug. 25, 2017, when he got the news of a gravitational-wave detection by LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory.

Predictions by GSI scientists now confirmed

On October 16 a team of scientists, including members from the LIGO and Virgo collaborations and several astronomical groups, announced the detection of both gravitational and electromagnetic waves, originating from the merger of two neutron stars. Show More Summary

Gravitational waves detected after collision of neutron stars 120 million light years away

On August 17, 2017, scientists at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors in Louisiana and Washington and at the Virgo detector in Italy detected the first "ripples in space," or gravitational waves, produced by the merger of two ancient remnants of stars known as neutron stars.

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