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Preparations for a new season of physics at the Large Hadron Collider

Last week, the detectors of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) witnessed their first collisions of 2017. These test collisions were not for physics research, instead they were produced as part of the process of restarting the LHC. But have patience, data taking for physics will start in another few days.

New U.S. and CERN agreements open pathways for future projects

DOE and CERN last week signed three new agreements outlining the contributions CERN will make to the Fermilab neutrino program and DOE’s contributions to the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider upgrade program.

CERN celebrates completion of Linac 4

At a ceremony today, CERN1 inaugurated its linear accelerator, Linac 4, the newest accelerator acquisition since the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Linac 4 is due to feed the CERN accelerator complex with particle beams of higher energy, which will allow the LHC to reach higher luminosity by 2021. Show More Summary

New particle flow algorithm improves ATLAS experiment precision

Proton collisions in the Large Hadron Collider often result in the production of "jets" of particles. These jets are a key element in the measurement of many processes, such as the decays of Higgs bosons or other exotic particles. A jet is a stream of particles produced when a quark or gluon is one of the outgoing particles of the decay.

Synopsis: Five Charming New Baryons

The discovery of five new baryonic states at the Large Hadron Collider could shed light on the strong nuclear force. [Physics] Published Tue May 02, 2017

#AskSymmetry Twitter chat with Tulika Bose

See Boston University physicist Tulika Bose's answers to readers’ questions about research at the Large Hadron Collider. [View the story "#AskSymmetry Twitter chat with Tulika Bose 4/28/17" on Storify]

Did you see it?

Boston University physicist Tulika Bose explains why there's more than one large, general-purpose particle detector at the Large Hadron Collider.

Did you see it?

Boston University physicist Tulika Bose explains why there's more than one large, general-purpose particle detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Physicist Tulika Bose of the CMS experiment at CERN explains how the CMS and ATLAS experiments...Show More Summary

Tracking particles at the energy frontier

A new age of exploration dawned at the start of Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider, as protons began colliding at the unprecedented centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The ATLAS experiment now frequently observes highly collimated bundles...Show More Summary

Strange Quarks at Large Hadron Collider Shed Light on Universe's 'Primordial Soup' Just After the Big Bang

Physicists say proton collisions can result in a large number of particles containing strange quarks—findings that challenge current theoretical models.

CERN's Large Hadron Collider --"Has Awakened from 'Hibernation' To Renew Search for New Dimensions, Gravitons, and Tiny Black Holes"

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has awoken from 'hibernation' – and it's ready to flip the switch and hunt for new dimensions, pushing the boundaries of our knowledge of particle physics. During the past winter, the LHC took a break...       Related Stories NASA's Hubble Space Telescope --Star-Casted Shadows Reveal Alien Planets  

Proton-nuclei smashups yield clues about 'quark gluon plasma'

Findings from Rice University physicists working at Europe's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are providing new insight about an exotic state of matter called the "quark-gluon plasma" that occurs when protons and neutrons melt.

Improving our understanding of di-photons

High-energy photon pairs at the Large Hadron Collider are famous for two things. First, as a clean decay channel of the Higgs boson. Second, for triggering some lively discussions in the scientific community in late 2015, when a modest excess above Standard Model predictions was observed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. Show More Summary

Not one, not two, but five new particles discovered with the Large Hadron Collider

The LHC, operating at unprecedented luminosities, has revealed a system of five "glue-like" particles that could help us to fill out a "periodic table" of subatomic particles. The post Not one, not two, but five new particles discovered with the Large Hadron Collider appeared first on ExtremeTech.

A new gem inside the CMS detector

This month scientists embedded sophisticated new instruments in the heart of a Large Hadron Collider experiment. Sometimes big questions require big tools. That’s why a global community of scientists designed and built gigantic detectors to monitor the high-energy particle collisions generated by CERN’s Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. Show More Summary

Upgrading the CERN LHC's CMS experiment detector

Sometimes big questions require big tools. That's why a global community of scientists designed and built gigantic detectors to monitor the high-energy particle collisions generated by CERN's Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland. From these collisions, scientists can retrace the footsteps of the Big Bang and search for new properties of nature.

Scientists At Large Hadron Collider Discover Five New Particle States

The discovery of the excited states of the charmed omega baryon could uncover new secrets about this type of particle and the quarks that make it.

A new gem inside the CMS detector

This month U.S. scientists embedded sophisticated new instruments in the heart of a Large Hadron Collider experiment.

Here's what open-heart surgery at the LHC looks like

Scientists at CERN have now completed "open-heart surgery" on one of the detectors at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In a complex operation that ran from 27 February to 9 March, the giant Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector received a new "heart" – it's Pixel Tracker.

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