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"Beyond Comprehension!" --Collision of Two Supermassive Black Holes Will Dwarf the LIGO Gravitational-Wave Discovery (Today's Most Popular)

"They absolutely dwarf the black hole mergers detected by LIGO," the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, which first detected gravitational waves from colliding black holes in February 2016, "and will be detected within 10 years," says Chiara Mingarelli, a Marie Curie...        

Rapid-response program to explore a double neutron star merger

Two years ago, scientists from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detected gravitational waves for the first time, proving Einstein's theory of relativity and his prediction of their existence. The waves were triggered by two black holes colliding.

LIGO Gravitational-Wave Observatory Back Online --"Upgrades Ability to 'See' Previously Undetected Events Farther Out in the Universe"

Scientists have restarted the twin detectors of LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, after making several improvements to the system. Over 2017, they have made enhancements to LIGO’s lasers, electronics, and optics that have increased the observatory’s sensitivity by 10...        

LIGO Gravitational-Wave Observatory Back Online --Upgraded Ability to "See" Previously Undetected Black Hole and Neutron-Star Events Farther Out in the Universe

Scientists have restarted the twin detectors of LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, after making several improvements to the system. Over 2017, they have made enhancements to LIGO’s lasers, electronics, and optics that have increased the observatory’s sensitivity by 10...        

"Nixed!" --Neutron Star Mashup Spikes Theories That Gravitational Waves Travel Faster Than Speed of Light (VIDEO)

On October 16, physicists announced that the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, LIGO, and VIRGO, the European Gravitational Observatory, detected gravitational waves from a neutron star merger that emitted high-energy light shortly after merging (view the sequential videos below). The...        

Researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

Astrophysicist Chris Fryer was enjoying an evening with friends on August 25, 2017, when he got the news of a gravitational-wave detection by LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory. The event appeared to be a merger of two neutron stars—a specialty for the Los Alamos National Laboratory team of astrophysicists that Fryer leads. Show More Summary

Gravitational waves detected after collision of neutron stars 120 million light years away

On August 17, 2017, scientists at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors in Louisiana and Washington and at the Virgo detector in Italy detected the first "ripples in space," or gravitational waves, produced by the merger of two ancient remnants of stars known as neutron stars.

LIGO announces detection of gravitational waves from colliding neutron stars

(University of Chicago) The US-based Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and the Virgo detector in Italy announced on Oct. 16 that all three of their detectors had picked up the ripples, or gravitational waves, from two neutron stars that collided 130 million years ago. Show More Summary

Columbia researchers to help LIGO Observatory discover gravitational waves

(Data Science Institute at Columbia) A research team from Columbia University received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to assist scientists at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the instrument that recently won a Nobel Prize for detecting gravitational waves.

NSF-funded LIGO pioneers named 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics laureates

(National Science Foundation) Three scientists who led the development of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) have won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for their work detecting gravitational waves -- ripples in space and time created by the motion of massive objects in the universe.

Gravitational waves will let us see inside stars as supernovae happen

On February 11th, 2016, scientists at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) announced the first detection of gravitational waves. This development, which confirmed a prediction made by Einstein's Theory of General Relativity a century ago, has opened up new avenues of research for cosmologists and astrophysicists. Show More Summary

"The Next Frontier" --LIGO May Be On the Verge of Announcing Major Gravitational Wave Discovery from Exotic New Source

At 6:07 today, August 25, LIGO, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory in Louisiana and Washington state, tweeted: "A very exciting @LIGO - VIRGO observing run is drawing to a close." If rumors leaking from LIGO who has recently partnered with...        

Ultra-sensitive measurement of nanoscale deformation

Nanoscale deformations could impact the high-precision experiments, such as the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)

LIGO detects gravitational waves for third time

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) has made a third detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time, demonstrating that a new window in astronomy has been firmly opened. As was the case with the first two detections, the waves were generated when two black holes collided to form a larger black hole.

LIGO detects gravitational waves for third time

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) has made a third detection of gravitational waves, ripples in space and time, demonstrating that a new window in astronomy has been firmly opened. As was the case with the first two detections, the waves were generated when two black holes collided to form a larger black hole.

Syracuse Alumnus instrumental in LIGO's third detection of gravitational waves

(Syracuse University) An alumnus of the College of Arts and Sciences has been instrumental in the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)'s third detection of gravitational waves, demonstrating that a new window onto astronomy is fully open.

Black hole collision detected by LIGO confirms another part of Einstein’s theory of relativity

Scientists with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO, have detected the signal from a cataclysmic collision between two black holes that lie 3 billion light-years away – much farther than the previous two discoveries. The findings, described in a paper accepted to Physical...

LIGO veteran to give talk about gravitational waves

(California Institute of Technology) Caltech's Stan Whitcomb, who has been involved with nearly every aspect of the development and ultimate success of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), will give a talk about the project's historic detection of gravitational waves on Feb. Show More Summary

LIGO veteran gives talk about gravitational waves

Caltech's Stan Whitcomb, who has been involved with nearly every aspect of the development and ultimate success of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), will give a talk about the project's historic detection of gravitational waves on February 19 at the American Associate for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting in Boston.

New book takes sound studies into the cosmos

"We can hear the universe" declared researchers at LIGO (the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) announcing the first detection of a gravitational wave last year.

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