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Introducing internet-based testing for STIs doubles testing uptake in South London boroughs

The randomised controlled trial of more than 2,000 people in Lambeth and Southwark was led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and King's College London¹, in partnership with SH:24, a digital sexual health service.

Introducing internet-based testing for STIs doubles testing uptake in South London boroughs

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Providing internet-based testing for Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) could increase the number of people being tested for syphilis, HIV, chlamydia and gonorrhoea, including among high-risk groups, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine.

New chronic kidney disease audit published

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships, Clinical Commissioning Groups and primary care practices must all work together to improve outcomes for patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), according to the national Chronic Kidney Disease Audit published today. Show More Summary

Paradoxes for Heidi Larson: The Vaccine Confidence Lady

By John Stone In an interview for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine website, Heidi Larson, founder of the Vaccine Confidence Project housed at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Yes, there are potential risks—there will always be potential...

Young people in sub-Saharan Africa integral to shaping future HIV/AIDS policy

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) 'To end HIV/AIDS it's crucial we start engaging with young people in sub-Saharan Africa who are affected -- interventions to improve their lives needn't be complex and costly, just sustainable,...Show More Summary

Changes in young people's sexual practices over the last 20 years revealed

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Young people today are taking part in a wider range of sexual practices, such as oral and anal sex, with opposite-sex partners compared to 20 years ago, according to new analysis by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and UCL.

Inducing first-time mums aged 35 and over earlier may reduce stillbirths and neonatal deaths

The cohort study of nearly 80,000 UK women giving birth in the NHS in England, led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine with the University of Cambridge, showed that inducing first-time mothers aged 35 or over 1-2 weeks...Show More Summary

Study of impact of climate change on temperatures suggests more deaths unless action taken

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) The largest study to date of the potential temperature-related health impacts of climate change has shown that as global temperatures rise, the surge in death rates during hot weather outweighs any decrease in deaths in cold weather, with many regions facing sharp net increases in mortality rates.

Severely bleeding patients must receive lifesaving drug within minutes, not hours

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Major bleeds must be treated with tranexamic acid (TXA) as fast as possible since deaths occur quickly and the drug's life-saving benefits diminish with each passing minute, according to a new study published in The Lancet.

Group B Streptococcus infection causes estimated 150,000 stillbirth & infant death

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) 21.7 million pregnant women carry this bacteria according to the first global study of Group B Strep -- most of them are currently unidentified and untreated. Study shows for first time that a maternal vaccine may prevent 231,000 infant and maternal GBS cases.

Upfront charging of overseas visitors using the NHS is a threat to everyone, argue experts

New rules for charging overseas visitors using the NHS are a threat to everyone, argue experts in The BMJ today. Martin McKee, Professor of European Public Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and Lucinda Hiam,...Show More Summary

Alcohol industry misleading the public about alcohol-related cancer risk

Led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine with the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, the team analysed the information relating to cancer which appears on the websites and documents of nearly 30 alcohol industry organisations...Show More Summary

Alcohol industry misleading the public about alcohol-related cancer risk

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) The alcohol industry (AI) is misrepresenting evidence about the alcohol-related risk of cancer with activities that have parallels with those of the tobacco industry, according to new research published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Review.

BCG jab may protect against TB for nearly twice as long as previously thought

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) The world's only licensed tuberculosis (TB) vaccine could offer protection against the disease for nearly twice as long as previously thought, according to new research published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

Despite testing program, children with HIV remain undiagnosed

(PLOS) A two-year clinic-based HIV testing program in Zimbabwe failed to diagnose many cases of HIV in children in the surrounding area, Dr. Victoria Simms from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, UK, and colleagues, report in PLOS Medicine.

Prince Harry Calls Out 'Absurd' Lack of Youth Education on HIV/AIDS

6 months agoLGBT / Gay : Out.com

As part of Monday's roundtable discussion at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Prince Harry Continues Mission to Raise HIV Awareness Like Mom Princess Diana

Prince Harry is following in his mother Princess Diana‘s footsteps! The 32-year-old royal headed to the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to learn about some of the world’s most pressing health issues on Monday (July 10) in London, England. While there, Harry heard more about the worldwide efforts to combat HIV, AIDS and [...]

Malaria control in African schools dramatically cuts infection and reduces risk of anemia

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Schools that provide prevention education, insecticide-treated nets and antimalarial treatment, in regions where malaria is highly seasonal, could reduce the risk of schoolchildren developing anemia and improve their cognitive performance, according to new research by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Male farmers at highest risk of contracting 'monkey malaria' in Malaysia

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Adult male farmers in Malaysia are more than twice as likely to contract Plasmodium knowlesi malaria -- an infection usually found only in monkeys -- than other people in their communities, according to a new study by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Menzies School of Health Research.

Undetected Ebola infection in international healthcare workers very unlikely

(London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine) Undiagnosed Ebola virus infection was probably very rare in international workers who were deployed during the 2013-2015 outbreak of the virus in West Africa, despite mild and asymptomatic cases of Ebola being known to occur, according to new research led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

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