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Sendak’s ‘Presto And Zesto In Limboland’ To Be Published In 2018

When Maurice Sendak died on May 8, 2012, the world mourned the loss of such great talent. His trove of wonder and whimsy, into which we escaped as children (and sometimes adults), would grow no more. Or so we thought. Click here to continue and read more...

Lost Maurice Sendak Book Uncovered From the Author’s Archives

last weekHumor / odd : mental_floss

'Presto and Zesto in Limboland' will be published in fall of 2018.

Found: An Unpublished Manuscript by Maurice Sendak

Since the beloved children’s author Maurice Sendak died in 2012, the foundation set up in his name has been working to collect and sort through his artwork and the records of his life. While working through some old files, Lynn Caponera, the president of the foundation, found the typewritten manuscript for a book. Show More Summary

Unknown Maurice Sendak Discovered (And At The Publisher)

"Lynn Caponera, president of the Maurice Sendak Foundation, was going through the late artist's files last year... when she found a typewritten manuscript titled Presto and Zesto in Limboland, co-authored by Sendak and his frequent collaborator, Arthur Yorinks.... Not only is the manuscript complete, so, too, are the illustrations."

A Long-Lost Maurice Sendak Book Will Be Published in 2018

A new, fully illustrated picture book by Maurice Sendak has been discovered among the late author and illustrator’s files, according to Publishers Weekly, and will be published late next year. Sendak’s former assistant and current president...Show More Summary

A New Maurice Sendak Book Will Be Published in 2018

Beloved Where the Wild Things author and illustrator Maurice Sendak passed away in 2012, but readers will be treated to a new book by the children’s writer in 2018. The news comes thanks to a discovery by Maurice Sendak Foundation president Lynn Caponera. She was going through the late author’s files and found a typewritten manuscript, […]

Brand New Book By Maurice Sendak Has Been Found In The Late Author's Archives

Last year, Maurice Sendak Foundation president Lynn Caponera stumbled across something weird while going through the late Maurice Sendak's collection of unpublished work. While she'd never heard of Presto and Zesto in Limboland, she'd found a manuscript for the unpublished book complete with illustrations. More »      

Extra, Extra: No Prison Break Is Complete Without A Drone

Prison escape with drone, a lost Maurice Sendak book will be published, the G train is watching you, and much more in today's day-end link roundup. Follow Gothamist on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and Snapchat, and like us on Facebook. You can also get the top stories mailed to you—sign up here. [ more › ]

Newswire: A lost Maurice Sendak book will be published next year

A full manuscript, complete with illustrations, of a lost book by Maurice Sendak has been unearthed in the late author’s Connecticut home. Discovered by Lynn Caponera—the president of the Maurice Sendak foundation and a friend and assistant...Show More Summary

This Where the Wild Things Are Baby Shower Is Sophisticated Nostalgia

Warning: this mystical Where the Wild Things Are baby shower will take your breath away! In honor of Megan's first baby, Shayla Hawkins Events planned a whimsical celebration inspired by Maurice Sendak's beloved children's book. The tented event turned into a spectacular wild rumpus with a green, brown, and white color palette. Show More Summary

Presto Manuscript

“What a miracle to find this buried treasure in the archives. To think something as good as this has been lying around there gathering dust.” An unpublished picture book by Maurice Sendak has been found, reports The Guardian; PrestoShow More Summary

Maurice Sendak’s Wild Things

Nat Hentoff’s 1966 Profile of Maurice Sendak, the author of “Where the Wild Things Are.”

Looking Deeper into Maurice Sendak’s Children’s Books

Whether you’re reading Sendak’s books aloud to children, or enjoying them alone, Jonathan Cott’s "There’s a Mystery There: The Primal Vision of Maurice Sendak" shows the ways Sendak used them to surface his intellectual interests and the playful and sometimes serious “wild things” that resided deep in his memories.

20 Maurice Sendak Quotes on Writing, Art & Literary Heroes

Happy birthday to Where the Wild Things Are author and illustrator Maurice Sendak. The Brooklyn-born artist who depicted children as creative, powerful beings with rich lives and minds of their own was inspired by a number of influences during his lifetime, including painters, musicians, and other authors. Sendak was often interviewed about children throughout his […]

Books of The Times: Digging to the Roots of Maurice Sendak’s Vision

In “There’s a Mystery There,” Jonathan Cott — with help from the playwright Tony Kushner, psychoanalysts and art historians — examines the influences and ideas in Sendak’s children’s books.

"Fresh Air’s 10 Favorite Terry Gross Interviews."

Explanations and audio here. I'm going to listen to all of these, beginning with Maurice Sendak.

Thug Notes Summary and Analysis of Where the Wild Things Are

3 months agoHumor / odd : Neatorama

Who doesn't love the book Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak? It was still a new book when I learned to read, and now it's a classic. So of course everyone will want to know what Sparky Sweets, PhD. thinks of it. This video, like all Thug Notes, contains NSFW language. Show More Summary

America doesn't care anymore, detains beloved children's book author

Imagine how America would react if Australia was mean to the late Maurice Sendak or even Eric Carle, author of The Very Hungry Caterpillar.  That's how the latter feels now, after hearing that beloved children's book author Mem Fox was...Show More Summary

Maurice Sendak—Author of Where the Wild Things Are— on Being a Kid

How does a child prevent dying or being eaten? Why can't a boy marry his sister? The post Maurice Sendak—Author of Where the Wild Things Are— on Being a Kid appeared first on The Good Men Project.

"I used to have a patchwork theory about the makers of children’s literature: that they were not so much people who spent a lot of time with kids as people who were still kids themselves."

"Among the evidence was that Beatrix Potter had no children, Maurice Sendak had no children, Margaret Wise Brown had no children, Tove Jansson had no children, and Dr. Seuss had no children. Even Willems began writing for children before he had a child. Show More Summary

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